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Who can get a coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine

People in the groups below can get a coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine.

If you have not booked your appointments yet, you're still eligible and can book anytime.

COVID-19 booster vaccine

The NHS is offering a booster vaccine dose to people most at risk from COVID-19 who have already had 2 doses of the vaccine.

Protection given by the COVID-19 vaccine decreases over time. A booster dose helps give you longer-term protection against getting seriously ill from COVID-19.

The NHS will let you know when it's your turn to have a booster dose. It's important not to contact the NHS for one before then.

People aged 18 and over

You can get a COVID-19 vaccine if you're aged 18 or over.

You can book appointments at a larger vaccination centre or pharmacy now, or wait to be invited to go to a local NHS service.

You can also book your vaccinations if you will turn 18 in the next 3 months.

Children and young people aged 12 to 17

Young people aged 16 and 17

You can get your 1st dose of a COVID-19 vaccine if you're aged 16 or 17.

The NHS will contact you when it's your turn to get the vaccine. You'll be invited to a local NHS service such as a GP surgery.

You cannot book your appointment online.

Some walk-in COVID-19 vaccination sites are offering the vaccine to people aged 16 and 17. You can check if a site is available near you.

Information:

If you turn 18 within the next 3 months, you can book your COVID-19 vaccination appointments online.

Children aged 12 to 15

All children aged 12 to 15 will be offered a 1st dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Parents and guardians will get a letter with information about when the vaccine will be offered.

Most children will be given their vaccine at school.

Some children are being offered 2 doses of the vaccine if either:

  • they live with someone who is more likely to get infections (such as someone who has HIV, has had a transplant or is having certain treatments for cancer, lupus or rheumatoid arthritis)
  • they have a condition that means they're at high risk from COVID-19

Conditions that mean your child may be at high risk and can get vaccinated are:

  • a severe problem with the brain or nerves, such as cerebral palsy
  • Down's syndrome
  • severe or multiple learning disabilities (or they're on the learning disability register)
  • a condition that means they're more likely to get infections (such as some genetic conditions or types of cancer)

If your child is eligible for 2 doses of the vaccine, you'll be contacted by a local NHS service such as their GP surgery to arrange their appointments.

More information

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccination for children and young people on GOV.UK

People at high risk from COVID-19 (clinically extremely vulnerable)

People at high risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19 (clinically extremely vulnerable), can get the COVID-19 vaccine.

If you're at high risk, you will have had a letter from the NHS saying you're clinically extremely vulnerable.

If you've had this letter, you can book appointments at a larger vaccination centre or pharmacy now, or wait to be invited to go to a local NHS service.

Information:

If you're not sure if you're at high risk, see who is at high risk from COVID-19.

People with other conditions that put them at higher risk

People with certain other health conditions are at high risk and can get the COVID-19 vaccine (as well as people who are clinically extremely vulnerable).

These conditions include:

  • long-term lung conditions (such as severe asthma, COPD, bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis)
  • long-term conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels (such as congenital heart disease, heart failure and peripheral arterial disease)
  • diabetes
  • chronic kidney disease
  • long-term liver conditions (such as cirrhosis and hepatitis)
  • conditions affecting the brain or nerves (such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, cerebral palsy or stroke)
  • learning disabilities
  • a condition or treatment that makes you more likely to get infections (such as HIV or some treatments for lupus, psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis)
  • severe mental conditions (such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder)
  • severe obesity (a BMI of 40 or above)

If you have a condition that means you can get the COVID-19 vaccine, the NHS will contact you to arrange your vaccination appointments.

You can also book appointments at a larger vaccination centre or pharmacy now if you would like to.

Information:

Some charities have worked with the NHS to produce advice about health conditions and COVID-19 vaccination.

Carers

You may be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine if any of the following apply:

  • you are a main carer for someone at high risk from COVID-19
  • your GP record shows you are a carer
  • you get a Carer's Allowance or other support following an assessment by your local authority

You may be able to book appointments at a larger vaccination centre or pharmacy.

If you think you should be eligible as a carer but you cannot book an appointment online, speak to your GP surgery. Your GP may be able to update your GP record and book an appointment for you at a local NHS service.

People who live and work in care homes

Anyone who lives or works in a care home can get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Contact your care home manager about getting vaccinated.

Frontline health workers

You can get the COVID-19 vaccine if you're a health worker who has direct contact with people at higher risk from COVID-19.

For example:

  • you work in a clinical role (such as a doctor or nurse)
  • you have contact in a non-clinical role (such as a receptionist or porter)
  • you work in a hospital laboratory, mortuary or a funeral home

You can book your appointments at a larger vaccination centre or pharmacy, or contact your employer about getting vaccinated.

Frontline social care workers

You can get the COVID-19 vaccine if you're a social care worker who provides face-to-face care or support to children or adults at higher risk from COVID-19.

For example:

  • you are a registered professional in social care (such as a social worker or nurse)
  • you work in residential care, nursing care or in supported living
  • you provide personal care for people in their homes

You are not currently eligible if you care for children who are not at high risk from COVID-19 (clinically extremely vulnerable), for example as a childminder or nursery nurse.

You can book your appointments at a larger vaccination centre or pharmacy, or contact your employer about getting vaccinated.

Information:

Vaccination priority groups

The order in which people are offered the COVID-19 vaccine is based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

Read the latest JCVI advice on priority groups for the COVID-19 vaccination on GOV.UK

Page last reviewed: 15 September 2021
Next review due: 29 September 2021