DRINKING

Do you like a drink?

Like to unwind with a glass of something in the evening? If you're not careful it's easy for the occasional glass in the evening to quickly become 2 or 3 glasses most days.

Men and women are advised not to drink more than 14 units of alcohol a week. This is the same as 6 pints of average strength beer a week. Regularly drinking more than this can increase the risk to your health.

It's important to know how much you are drinking and the easy ways you can cut back.

Drink and you

It may seem like you don't drink much, but a drink or two most evenings can do harm to your body. From making you gain weight to increasing your risk of cancer, alcohol can have serious effects on your body.

The more you drink, and the more often, the greater the risk to your health.

Feeling drunk

Alcohol affects everyone differently, but drinking a lot in a short space of time can affect you in lots of ways. It can increase your risk of being in an accident, ending up in an argument or fight, or taking part in illegal or risky behaviour, like drink driving or unsafe sex.

Booze and your body

If you regularly drink more than the lower risk guidelines you increase your risk of developing health problems such as high blood pressure, liver problems, heart attack and some types of cancer. Find out more about the risks.

Other health worries

If you have other health problems, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, or are suffering from depression or anxiety, alcohol may make conditions worse. Plus, those hidden calories in your drinks can put you at serious risk of becoming overweight or obese.

Why cut down?

If you regularly drink above the lower risk guidelines, cutting back on alcohol can help your general wellbeing. Once you start cutting back, you'll probably notice the benefits. The biggest benefit is the reduced risk to your health, but there are lots of others, too.

Medical warning: If you have physical withdrawal symptoms (shaking, sweating or feelings of anxiety until you have your first drink of the day) you should take medical advice before stopping completely – it can be dangerous to do this too quickly and without proper advice and support. Call Drinkline free on 0300 123 1110 for more advice.

Be healthier

Drinking too much too often can have an impact on your health. Reduce your risks by knowing how much you are drinking and making sure you don't drink more than the lower risk guidelines.

Save some cash

Drinking less is not only great for your health, it's also great for your wallet, too. The cost of drinking alcohol can quickly add up. Think how much you could save by making some small changes and cutting down. 

Feel full of beans

Once you start cutting back, you may quickly find you have more energy and feel less tired during the day. Drinking can affect your sleep and stop you from sleeping deeply, so drinking less should help you feel more rested and full of beans.

Drink less

It's important to know how much you are drinking and that there are easy ways you can cut back, without cutting alcohol out completely.

You could try making some simple swaps when you're out, or, if you drink every day, having at least a couple of booze-free nights each week.

Tools to cut down

There are lots of great tools to help you drink less. Try our FREE Alcohol Checker for a 7-day snap shot of how much you drink, how many calories it adds up to and how much it costs.

Top tips to drink less

Keen to cut down? You can still enjoy a drink without stopping altogether. Why not swap strong beers or wine for lower-strength ones or choose a smaller drink? Check out the simple ways you can cut down now.

Need more support?

Struggling to cut down or think you might have a problem with drinking? Realising you have a problem is the first step to making a change. There's lots of help out there and a good place to start is with a visit to your GP, find your local alcohol support service or call Drinkline free on 0300 123 1110.

Other Health Information

Alcohol Checker

Try our new checker for a 7-day snap shot of how much you drink, how many calories it adds up to and how much it costs.

Learn more