Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

0113 855 5000 2150 Century Way, Thorpe Park , Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS15 8ZB
http://www.leedsandyorkpft.nhs.uk/

1 out of 5 stars

Based on 11 ratings for this trust

Overview

News:

  • New mental health service for armed forces veterans
  • Kindness, compassion and respect - staff praised in latest CQC report
The Becklin Centre

Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (LYPFT) provides specialist mental health and learning disability services to people in Leeds.

We also provide specialist inpatient Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and Low Secure Forensic Service in York which serve the regional population. Our specialist services accept national referrals.

Service users are at the heart of our organisation. We constantly strive to provide the best possible care and support, working closely with related organisations to provide effective, accessible and modern mental health and learning disability services.

Working in partnership with our local communities, our core purpose is to improve the mental health and well-being of the people who use our services.

We aim to provide excellent quality mental health and learning disability care that supports people to achieve the very best that they can for their health and wellbeing.

And as a teaching trust with strong links to local universities, we have a reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching, research and development.

We believe that we can make a real difference to people’s health and lives and, by doing so, give hope for the future to the people who use our services, to their families and their carers.

 

Latest news

New mental health service for armed forces veterans

Plans for a new mental health service for armed forces veterans across the North of England have been announced.

The Veterans’ Mental Health Complex Treatment Service (VMH CTS) for the north of England will be provided by Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, working with the UK’s leading charity for veterans’ mental health, Combat Stress. It will offer support to former forces personnel in communities from South Yorkshire and Cheshire up to the Scottish Borders.  

Rollout of the new service, which will increase access to local care and treatment for 130 veterans with complex mental health issues over the next two years, began in early April. It will offer therapies for veterans experiencing psychological trauma (such as post-traumatic stress disorder), alongside a range of other treatments including help with substance misuse, physical health, employment, accommodation, relationships and finances.

The support will be provided by a team in tune with military needs and will be provided by staff based throughout the region. It will combine the practical health expertise of the NHS with the vital work and knowledge of Combat Stress.

Lawrence Atkins is a Specialty Doctor at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and worked as a Medical Officer in the Territorial Army for 14 years. He said:

“Military life is very different to civilian life, both in terms of the way it is structured and the challenges it entails. When people leave the military, they can find it difficult to adapt to a civilian lifestyle and that transition can be problematic, long-term and significant.

“We know that within the military, there are still some barriers to recognising the existence of a mental health problem. People can end up leaving the forces with a mental health condition that has been left undisclosed and untreated.

“The Veterans’ Mental Health Complex Treatment Service (VMH CTS) is a new and innovative approach to the treatment of military veterans with complex mental health concerns. It’s part of a wider NHS strategy which is increasingly recognising the unique needs of the veteran population.

“This service recognises that veterans do not always engage well with more traditional NHS services, either because they don’t know what’s available or they don’t believe the NHS can help them. We therefore know there is a real need for this service and by working in partnership with Combat Stress, we hope to bridge the gap between the support offered by the NHS and military charities.

“We hope this will help to engage those veterans who traditionally seek support and treatment outside the NHS.”

Sue Freeth, Chief Executive of Combat Stress, said:

“We are pleased to be working with Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust to deliver the Veterans’ Mental Health Complex Treatment Service.

“For almost a century Combat Stress has provided a dedicated service to support and treat former servicemen and women with mental health problems.

“Although most of today’s service personnel transition successfully from the military to civilian life, a significant minority develop mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Left untreated, this can have a devastating impact on veterans and their loved ones.

“In the last ten years Combat Stress has seen a 143% increase in referrals, with veterans having waited on average more than a decade before seeking help.

“We welcome the opportunity to work with the NHS to provide more support and treatment options to former servicemen and women struggling with their mental health.”

 

Last updated on 15 June 2018.

Kindness, compassion and respect - staff praised in latest CQC report

Service users and carers have given Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust overwhelmingly positive feedback on how they’re treated in the latest inspection report from the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

In its report, the Commission says staff are ‘caring and compassionate during their interactions with patients’ and that ‘feedback from patients confirmed that staff treated them well and with kindness, compassion and respect.’

The report goes on to say that ‘patients were positive about the care and treatment they received and felt involved in the decision-making’ and that ‘staff involved carers and others close to patients in decisions about the care and treatment provided by the service.’

The report shows that 85% of the Trust’s services are now rated as either ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’. However the Trust’s overall rating is ‘requires improvement’.

The seven services inspected as part of the CQC’s new well-led inspection process were:

  • acute wards for adults of working age and psychiatric intensive care units
  • forensic inpatient/secure wards
  • child and adolescent mental health wards
  • wards for people with learning disability or autism
  • mental health crisis services and health-based places of safety
  • The National Inpatient Centre for Psychological Medicine
  • The Specialised Supported Living Service

The mental health crisis services and health-based places of safety has moved up from ‘requires improvement’ in three of the five areas to ‘good’ and now has an overall rating of ‘good’.

 The Specialised Supported Living Service - which supports people with learning disabilities - has made huge improvements and is now rated as ‘good’ in all domains and ‘outstanding’ for caring.

The National Centre for Psychological Medicine has been recognised as being ‘outstanding’ in being effective and caring.

The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) in York has now been rated ‘good’ across all domains. 

Forensic low secure services in Leeds and York remained as ‘requires improvement’, as did wards for people with a learning disability or autism. Acute wards for adults of working age and our psychiatric intensive care unit were downgraded from good to ‘requires improvement’.

Sara Munro, Chief Executive of Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“There are many examples of fantastic quality care in the report and I’m delighted to see these have been recognised. I am particularly heartened to see the positive feedback from service users and carers about the treatment they receive from staff across the board. This is well deserved and staff should be proud of themselves.

“I am also pleased that, whilst the CQC raised a number of risk areas, there were no incidences or evidence of service users receiving poor treatment or inappropriate care. 

She added that the Trust was already addressing a number of the big issues raised in the report including launching a new system to manage clinical supervision; investing in new patient records software and working with partners to find a new base for the National Inpatient Centre for Psychological Medicine.

 “I am confident that we can make the necessary changes rapidly and I’m keen to work with the CQC and to encourage them to return for another well-led inspection ahead of schedule so we can achieve the ratings we deserve,” Sara said.

 

Last updated on 15 June 2018.

Things you should know

• We provide excellent quality, evidence-based, safe care that involves people and promotes recovery and wellbeing
• We work with partners and local communities to improve health and lives
• We value and develop our workforce and those supporting us
• We provide efficient and sustainable services

Latest reviews of this organisation

SUN meetings

SUN group…..good idea but poorly executed. The SUN group question time was dominated by a few people known to the panel, and they kept j...

11 October 2018

Patient Experience Team leave alot to be desired

The care I received was awful. The complaints team took over 30 working days to resolve my complaint. I went to the SUN network questi...

4 October 2018

Culture summed up in the car park

Visiting the Becklin Centre is clearly distressing for anyone. It starts on arrival where the inadequate privately managed parking has le...

28 September 2018

Mental health

I have been with east team cpn service since 18yrs old I’m now 54 but this last cpn I have had ad got to be the worst I have ever had I h...

17 September 2018

I don't think I'll ever ring the crisis team again

This all started when my old CBT counciler refered me to the CMHT, I had the assessment and they said they would contact me via letter wi...

20 August 2018

Last updated on 15 June 2018.

Information supplied by Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust