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Country-by-country guide

Accessing healthcare in Ireland

You will be treated on the same basis as a resident of Ireland. Remember, each country’s health system is different and might not include all the things you would expect to get free of charge from the NHS. This may mean that you have to make a patient contribution to the cost of your care. If you have to make such a payment , you may be able to seek reimbursement for this cost when you are back in the UK if you are not able to do so in Ireland.

It is important that you ensure that you are treated by a state healthcare provider as you will not be covered for private healthcare. You should be particularly careful if the healthcare arrangements have been made by a hotel or travel representative.

Non-EEA nationals are covered in Ireland.

 

Where to get information while in Ireland

Contact the Health Service Executive (HSE) for information before leaving the UK.

Health Service Executive (HSE)
Oak House,
Millennium Park,
Naas,
Co. Kildare

Telephone: 00353 (0)45 880400

or

Health Service Executive (HSE)
Parkgate St. Business Centre,
Dublin 8

Telephone: 00353 (0)1 635 2500

Website: www.hse.ie

Information is also available from the Citizens Information website.

Find your local HSE office:

HSE Dublin/North East
Rathdown Road
Dublin 7
Telephone: 00 353 1 882 5000

HSE Dublin/Mid Leinster
Local health Office
Tivoli Road
Dun Laoghaire
Co. Dublin
Telephone: 00 353 1 284 3579

HSE West
Local Health Office
Community Services
25 Newcastle Road
Galway
Telephone 00 353 91 523 122

HSE South
Local health Office
Abbeycourt House
George’s Quay
Cork
Telephone 00 353 21 4965 511

Emergency numbers

In case you find yourself in an emergency during your stay in Ireland, dial 112 or 999. You might want to save the number in your phone.

 

Treatment, coverage and costs

Doctors

Contact any doctor who is contracted to the Primary Care Reimbursement Service (PCRS) scheme. Treatment is provided free of charge by PCRS doctors. You can get details of PCRS doctors from your local Health Service Executive (HSE) office. If you are not sure if your doctor is contracted to the PCRS, make clear you want to be treated under the public health system.

Out-of-hours services are provided by GP cooperatives in conjunction with the HSE. Some out-of-office surgeries are listed here:

Western Area- West Doc: 1850 365000
Mid Western Area - Shannon Doc: 1850 212999
Southern Area - South Doc GP Co-op: 1850 335999
South Eastern Area (including Wicklow) - Care Doc: 1850 334999

North Dublin - D-DOC: 1850 22 44 77
Dub Doc: 01 4545607
Dublin - DL Doc: 01 6639869
Dublin - East Doc: 01 2094021
Dublin - Luke Doc: 01 406 5158

Kildare - K Doc: 1890 599362
Midland Area – MI Doc: 1850 302702
North Eastern Area - NE Doc: 1850 777911
Leitrim North Roscommon Donegal –
Now Doc: 1850 400911

Dentists

Emergency dental treatment, including denture repair, is available from any dentist contracted to HSE. Contact your local HSE for details of contracted dentists or HSE clinics.

Hospital treatment

In emergencies go directly to an accident and emergency unit of any public hospital. There will be no charge if you are entitled to be treated under the EU regulations. Planned treatment in Ireland from a public hospital must be arranged by a doctor, specialist or consultant contracted to the public system. Only, patients who are eligible under the EU regulations
and who seek state-funded healthcare will be treated free of charge.

Specialists

You will need a doctor’s referral for any specialist treatment. Inform your doctor in advance that you do not wish to be treated as private patient. Treatment in the public health system is provided free of charge. . It is important to be aware that many consultants share their time between public and private treatment. If you see a specialist or consultant as a private patient, you will be charged and those charges are not refundable.

Prescriptions

Prescribed medicines must be dispensed by a doctor within the PCRS and your prescription should state that the medicine is to be provided free of charge.

Ambulance

No information available

Air ambulance

No information available

Making healthcare arrangements in advance

The most common treatments or conditions that require advanced arrangements are listed below. For all other conditions or treatments, you should consult your doctor. Remember, for all treatments abroad you must present your EHIC.

Oxygen therapy

Ensure your EHIC is valid before you travel. In most cases you will have to use the authorised oxygen company for the country you are travelling to. You’ll also have to make your own arrangements, including arranging for permission from your hotel to deliver and install the equipment. There may also be additional costs that the EHIC will not cover.

Your home oxygen supplier is not required to provide a service outside the UK, however, most suppliers will be able to advices you on what to do. Your oxygen treatment clinic will organise your home oxygen supply from one of these suppliers:

Air Liquid: Call them on:

  • 0808 143 9991 for London
  • 0808 143 9992 for North West
  • 0808 143 9993 for East Midlands
  • 0808 143 9999 for South West

Air Products: covers Yorkshire and Humberside, West Midlands and Wales. Call them on 0800 373 580.

BOC: covers the East and North East of England. Call them on 0800 136 603.

Dolby Vivisol: covers the South of England. Call them on 0500 823 773.

The British Lung Foundation (BLF) may have additional oxygen contacts for the country you are travelling to. Their website offers general advice about how to make travel arrangements, including advice on:

Ensure you allow plenty of time to make all your arrangements before you travel.

Dialysis

You need to speak to the co-ordinator in your UK Dialysis Unit who will contact the dialysis unit in Ireland nearest to where you will be staying. However, the provision of dialysis will be subject to availability in Ireland.

Leisure or business - using your EHIC in Ireland

There is an agreement between the UK and Irish authorities, which means that the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is not needed by UK residents visiting, working or living in Ireland.

How to claim refunds

Reimbursements are claimed directly from the Health Service Executive (HSE) offices. You will need to send your original receipts with your claim. Remember to keep copies of anything you send for your records.

If you have had to pay for the cost of your care and have been unable to claim a refund during your stay in Ireland you should contact the Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle) on 0191 218 1999 (Monday - Friday, 8am - 5pm) on your return to the UK. However, this process will take longer than claiming for a refund in Ireland.

 

Living in Ireland

How to register your E121 or E106

You do not need an E121 or E106 to access healthcare in Ireland. Instead, contact your local Health Service Executive (HSE) office for information. You will need proof of your UK pension.

How to register with a GP

No information available

 

Working in Ireland

How to register your E106

It is not necessary to apply for an E106 to access healthcare in Ireland. Instead, contact your local office of the Health Service Executive (HSE) for information with proof of your status.

How to register with a GP

No information available

 

Am I still eligible for treatment under the NHS?

UK citizens registered in another EEA country and using an E106 or E121 are not automatically eligible for free treatment in the UK.

Visit the 'Planned treatment abroad' section for detailed information.

 

Page last reviewed: 23/06/2011

Next review due: 23/06/2013

Special agreements

There is an agreement  between the UK and Irish authorities, which means that forms E106, E121 and the EHIC are not needed by UK residents visiting, working or living in Ireland. 

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