How do I deal with burns and scalds? (9 to 30 months) 

Health visitor Melissa Green talks about the things you can do to deal with burns and scalds.

Find out more about how to cope with accidents.

Transcript of How do I deal with burns and scalds? (9 to 30 months)

How do I deal with burns and scalds?   Naresh: “If your child has a burn or a scald, it's important to treat them quickly, as their skin is much thinner than adult skin and the best chance of healing will be to deal with the burn quickly. The most important thing to do is immediately run cold water over the burn for no more than 10 minutes. Now, this water should be cold, but not ice-cold, as babies and toddlers and children can get cold quite quickly.   If you have no running water to place on the burn, then use another cool fluid, something like milk. The next thing would be to place something over your child's burn. This is so the skin is protected from any risk of infection. So something like cling film would be OK or a clean linen tea towel or even a clean plastic bag.   If your child has something stuck to their burn, please don't try and remove it. Just leave it there and take them to the hospital. And also don't add anything to the burn. So don't add any creams or lotions to the burn. If your child has a burn larger than a postage stamp, it's important to take them to get medical advice from the hospital.   If your child complains of pain after their burn, then you can give them something like paracetamol or ibuprofen. You wouldn't want to give them any aspirin. If your child has a blister after their burn, don't tamper with it, it will burst naturally, and when it does, the skin underneath will be very delicate and raw, and may well need a dressing, so see your doctor or your practice nurse for this dressing.”

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