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Getting your medicines if there's a no-deal Brexit - Medicines information

The government is working closely with the NHS and suppliers to make sure medicines and medical products continue to be available in all scenarios.

Please keep ordering your repeat prescriptions and taking your medicines as normal.

The NHS, through your local doctor's surgery and pharmacy, will keep you informed if there are any changes.

It's very important you don't order more medicines than normal. If you do, then it may mean that other people won't be able to get their medicines.

The government has asked suppliers of medical goods to build up at least 6 weeks' worth of extra stocks above usual level.

It has also bought extra ferry capacity so medicines and medical products will be prioritised for import for you to continue to receive your medicines on time.

Occasionally, the NHS does experience temporary shortages of some medicines.

If this happens, you will be prescribed the best alternative to your usual medicine, as happens normally.

Over 2.5 million prescription items are dispensed in primary care alone in England every day, and the NHS has existing ways of making sure that you get your medicines and medical products, even under difficult circumstances.

If you are concerned, please speak to your doctor or pharmacist.

You can also read NHS England's answers to common questions about getting your medicines after Brexit.

Get more information on Brexit and what it could mean for you

Page last reviewed: 28 February 2019
Next review due: 28 February 2022