How do I stop my child hitting, biting and fighting? (6 to 30 months) 

Health vsitor Gemma Crisp explains the steps you can take to stop your toddler hitting, biting, kicking and fighting.

Find out more about dealing with difficult behaviour.

Transcript of How do I stop my child hitting, biting and fighting? (6 to 30 months)

How do I stop my child hitting, biting and fighting?   Gemma: “All children will go through a stage probably where they hit or bite or push another child or their parent, so it's nothing to be worried about.   Children often use their mouths to explore the world around them. They don't understand they might hurt somebody if they hit or bite. Sometimes they're just copying things that they've seen, so it's quite normal they should do it. Sometimes children bite or hit out of frustration. You might find if there's a new baby in the house that they'll start biting or kicking as a way of expressing something about their worries about the new baby in the house.   If you find that your child has hurt somebody else, then it's important to make a big fuss of the child that they've hurt, so your child gets the impression that they're not going to get the attention for that difficult behaviour. You might want to move them away from you, if they've hurt you. So, again, there's a reduction in the attention that they get from you.   It's a good idea to praise them if you've seen them being kind to another child or being loving towards their new brother or sister, so that they learn that that's the behaviour you want to see. It's a stage that most children will go through and that if you can stay calm and show them reasonable boundaries around them doing it, then it is something that will pass over time. It doesn't mean they'll always be aggressive. They will learn there are other ways you want them to behave.”    

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