The NHS Organ Donation Register

The NHS Organ Donation Register
is a confidential register

where people are able to register

their wishes to donate their organs
and tissues after their death.

They can specify on
the Organ Donor Register

which organs and tissues
they do want to donate.

And when we discuss organ donation

with the loved ones of
the person who's died,

we give the families the option

of which organs and tissues they
would like their loved one to donate

if their loved one's wishes are not
specifically known at that point.

We make sure the family understand
those tests will be undertaken.

If you change your mind,

then of course you can remove your name
from that register at any point.

The most important thing,

whether someone registered on the Organ
Donor Register or carries a donor card,

is that also they make it clear to their
family that they want to be a donor.

Therefore,
if there's been a conversation

between a patient and their family

making it clear
that they want to donate,

then their family should be able
to see that through for them.

The majority of organ transplants
are carried out

following patients
who donate organs after their death.

However, it is possible for some organs

to be donated
by people who are still living.

There are a number of patients
who receive kidney transplants.

It's also possible, in a very small
and rare number of cases,

for somebody to donate
part of their liver.

All potential organ donors
are screened for transmissible diseases

such as HIV and hepatitis.

At the time
that we discuss organ donation

with the family of
the person who's died,

we make sure the family understand
those tests will be undertaken.

Their name and details will only be used
by NHS Blood and Transplant,

and other healthcare professionals
that are relevant to donation.

Their details won't be shared
with any other organisations.

We maintain the confidentiality
of both the donor, their family,

and the recipients.

Until such time, if ever,

that both parties would want
to share information with each other.

There will always be a discussion
had with their family

at the time of their death

to ensure their family understand
what the deceased's wishes were

and to fulfil those wishes.

The most important thing,

whether someone registered on the Organ
Donor Register or carries a donor card

is that they make clear to their
family that they want to be a donor.

Whether somebody registers
their wish to be an organ donor

after their death or not,

the doctors and nurses caring for you
in hospital will always do their utmost

to save your life
and to ensure a dignified death.

The operation is carried out in the
hospital in which the person has died.

It's carried out in the operating
theatre under sterile conditions,

as every other surgical procedure
is carried out.

Every effort is made to maintain dignity
and respect of the person who's died.

Following an organ donation operation,

there is no reason for loved ones,
relatives, friends

not to come and see the patient
who's died and view the body.

If somebody wishes to be a donor
after their death,

and the family give their consent
or authorisation to donation,

the funeral will not be delayed.

The costs associated with organ donation
are borne by the NHS,

both in terms of the retrieval operation
and the transplantation.

So there are no costs to the family.

*ORGAN DONOR LINE

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