Ménière’s disease 

Introduction 

Tinnitus (BSL version)

Tinnitus causes people to hear constant sounds in one ear, both ears or in their head. An audiologist explains the possible causes and effects it often has, such as stress and anxiety, plus how to deal with them. Ashleigh, who was diagnosed with tinnitus in 2005, describes how she copes with it.

Media last reviewed: 30/09/2013

Next review due: 30/09/2015

Hearing problems

How to protect your hearing, with tips on spotting when you're going deaf, getting tested and hearing aids

Ménière's disease is a rare disorder that affects the inner ear. It can cause vertigo, tinnitushearing loss, and a feeling of pressure deep inside the ear.

People with Ménière's disease usually experience these symptoms during sudden attacks that typically last around two to three hours, although it can take a day or two for the symptoms to disappear completely.

It's worth noting, however, that the symptoms and severity of Ménière's disease vary widely from person to person.

You should see your GP if you experience any of the symptoms of Ménière's disease so they can try to identify the problem and refer you to a specialist if necessary.

Read more about the symptoms of Ménière's disease and diagnosing Ménière's disease.

How Ménière's disease progresses

Ménière's disease often progresses through different stages. In the early stages, most people have sudden and unpredictable attacks of vertigo, accompanied by nausea, vomiting and dizziness.

During the later stages, the episodes of vertigo tend to occur less frequently and sometimes stop altogether within five to 10 years. However, the tinnitus and hearing loss often become worse over time and you may be left with permanent balance problems.

Who is affected

In the UK, it's estimated that around one in 1,000 people have Ménière's disease.

Ménière's disease most commonly affects people aged 20-60 and it is thought to be slightly more common in women than men.

What causes Ménière's disease?

The exact cause of Ménière's disease is unknown, but it is thought to be caused by a problem with the pressure deep inside the ear.

Things that can increase your risk of developing Ménière's disease include a family history of the condition and a chemical imbalance in the fluid in your inner ear.

Read more about the causes of Ménière's disease.

How Ménière's disease is treated

There is not yet an absolute cure for Ménière’s disease, but treatments can usually help people with the condition control their symptoms.

Possible treatments include:

  • medications to treat the symptoms and prevent attacks
  • changes to your diet, such as a low-salt diet
  • balance training (vestibular rehabilitation)
  • relaxation techniques
  • surgery, in more severe cases

There are a number of different surgical procedures that may be used to treat people with Ménière’s disease, depending on how troublesome your symptoms are and whether only one or both ears are affected. However, there is still uncertainty about the effectiveness of some surgical treatments, and research is continuing in these areas.

Read more about the treatment of Ménière's disease.

Support and advice

People with Ménière's disease may also find the condition has a significant impact on their mental health. The unpredictable nature of the attacks and the restrictions this can place on your activities can lead to feelings of anxiety and depression.

Your GP can offer advice and support if you are finding it difficult to cope with the effect Ménière's disease is having on your life. There are also a number of support groups, such as the Meniere's Society, that can provide assistance and advice.

Read more about living with Ménière's disease.




Page last reviewed: 23/01/2014

Next review due: 23/01/2016

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Comments

The 43 comments posted are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

Fellow Sufferer said on 26 September 2014

In the US they prescribe valium which helped my attacks - in the UK they tend to rely on Serc.

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Fellow Sufferer said on 26 September 2014

Some hope for fellow sufferers. I first had Meniere's at the age of 30 in 1988. No one knew what it was back then - had MRI brain scans, the lot. Finally diagnosed in 1993 after years of violent and unexpected attacks. I gradually became deaf in one ear and have impossible balance (don't even think about putting me on a boat!)but escaped tinnitus. The symptoms (other than deafness and balance) completely disappeared from 1994 until today (2014). So I had 20 symptom free years with only a mild handicap. If anyone has research on whether Meniere's vertigo and vomiting problems recur after a very long period, please post a link. Thought I was free! Still, it is possible to live a normal life (even if you think you are dying during the truly horrible vertigo attacks and tears/fatigue that follow). Good luck

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JEANALl76 said on 12 September 2014

HI has anybody had the injections for meneires disease

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Morgy1969 said on 05 September 2014

I Have recently been diagnosed with Meneire's disease after around 8 years of symptoms. Don't get me wrong i'm not going to say that the NHS who took so long to diagnose the issue it was partly my fault as well. It started with a huge terrifying Vertigo attack one morning whilst brushing my teeth in the bathroom (words can't express how this feels unless you have experianced it for yourself) i recovered from this after a few hours and life went on, then i started getting regular vertigo attacks (some lasting for mins, some for hours, and twice for weeks.
this was also followed by tinnitus and a feeling that someone is blowing balloons up in your ears and sharp pains that make you wince and cringe your jaw and eyes.
The worst problem is the Vertigo however i am now partly deaf around 30% deaf in the right ear and 10% deaf in the left (above age average which means at my age 45, i should normally be around 2 to 6 % deaf) in either ear.
The pain and pressure persist on a daily basis as does the balance problems (although Vertigo has eased off somewhat, 'for now)
This is Meneire's disease and what it feels like. i am pleased that i eventually got diagnosed as it's nice to find out what is wrong with you.


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sarahljr64 said on 24 August 2014

I suffer from tinnitus and can anyone tel me how to cope with it ?? as it is now getting me down , i can't sleep and i am unable to get on with my life and i am new to tinnitus?

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joolsf said on 02 March 2014

I dont know if this is what im suffering with, but the ringing in my years has got worse over the years, sometimes its hardly there unless its quiet but today i have woken up with the worst buzzing in my ears ive had in a long time.Over the years i have suffered with about 4 severe bouts of vertigo,causing awful sickness.Its very helpful to read pages like this so you know your not alone and other people are experiencing the same symptoms as me, im going to make an appointment to see the Dr now this week.

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tagcarter said on 25 January 2014

Just stumbled across this bit of research that might be worth a read for anyone suffering from this condition.

http://www.chiroindex.org/?search_page=articles&action=&articleId=21505

very interesting results for chiropractic manipulation of the upper cervical spine in treatment for this condition.

Results: One hundred thirty out of one hundred and thirty nine patients had inferior and posterior listings with laterality on the opposite side of their involved ear. After one or two specific cervical adjustments, one hundred and thirty six out of the one hundred and thirty nine patients presented with balanced legs and an absence or dramatic reduction of symptoms, especially vertigo. After two years, on a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 representing the absence of the symptom and 10 being the worst imaginable, vertigo was lowered from an average of 8.5 to 1.4.

Conclusion: Prior to the onset of symptoms, all one hundred and thirty nine cases suffered cervical traumas; most from automobile accidents, resulting in previously undiagnosed whiplash injuries. It is unlikely coincidental that one hundred and thirty out of one hundred and thirty nine consecutive Meniere’s patients would present with a posterior and inferior atlas listing with laterality on the opposite side of the involved ear. More research on Meniere’s and chiropractic is needed.

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tackyaccy said on 23 March 2013

I had dizzy spells when I was a kid and put it down to going to the public baths and getting water in my ears. I was given some sickly pink liquid probably calpol, I was okay on and off up to reaching age 60 and was diagnosed with labrynthitus by my doctor.
Things did not improve I got really hard of hearing and bad tinnitus in my left ear, this graduated to both ears until one day I was so dizzy and sick I dropped to the floor and was unable to move for 11 hrs, I was spinning uncontrollably, when I eventually stopped and managed to get on the sofa I slept and slept and slept. I have dizzy spells on and off monthly, I packed in work as I could not work on my own they said it was a health and safety issue. I got kicked off benefit's and now have no money coming in, the DHSS does not recognise meniers or vertigo as a disability how bad is that. I have used serc 8 and 16 but if you do a bit of research on betahistine in America doctors say they are placebo's. Good luck to all who suffer this disease, seems like we just have to put up with it and keep quiet.

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ozzy63 said on 04 July 2012

was diagnosed with this just over 12 months ago , for 6-12 months before i was diagnosed i was told i had exhaustion , from working too many hours , then i was told i had a virus , as i kept having dizzy spells sweating sickness and collapsing at work on the job and was really tired i eventually lost my job as they didnt think i was up to it prior to this i was as fit as a fiddle , i feel my lifestyle has been cut in half , then halved again as i cant go out much , i cant work , i cant even have a pint of beer on a sunday dinner and a game of pool with the lads , i cant take my kids swimming alone , or venture out alone apart from the local shop 100 yards im know depressed and feel like an hermit , im now on employment support allowance and not getting the full benefits as when i went for a medical the ATOS doc said i was fine

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roundabout said on 13 May 2012

Geoff. If you have only just started to get attacks and you are 77 it is unlikely to be Meniere's Disease. These symptoms can be caused by other things such as problems with your neck etc.
Your attitude of getting on with your life is a good one though. Sometimes people find support groups help where others are able to understand. True Meniere's Disease can range in intensity from being a minor inconvenience to being life, family and soul destroying .
Help can be found via the Meniere's Society and forums such as Manage Meniere's UK

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Geoff Dellow said on 02 April 2012

I had an attack yesterday which would appear to be this disease. I totally lost my sense of balance for about ten minutes and the world reeled and I felt sick.
I have tinnitus and have a loss of hearing.
Reading the comments below makes me realise that we are a whole lot of very frightened people.
Having thought about it I have, for the most part, got over my fright. I hope the following might help others.
I am 77. It is inevitable that I am going to die. Thus my philosophy is that I will continue to concentrate on everything that makes my life enjoyable or at least gives me something to live for.
If there isn't a cure and that what treatment that is available involves drugs with severe side effects I prefer to do nothing.
I shall at all times carry my mobile phone and will avoid putting others at risk where possible in case another attack occurs.
I await my next attack to see how I will cope - I suspect it will be managable. - I will be going to my doctor to check out that I've made the right diagnosis.
Best wishes to you all. I have a blog!

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Geoff Dellow said on 02 April 2012

I have already attempted to make a comment and need to see that the system works before proceeding further

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Geoff Dellow said on 02 April 2012

It looks like I may have the above disease as I had my first attach yesterday. I realise it's early days.
I don't plan to do anything other than notify my doctor.

I don't believe in focussing on my illnesses but rather on my health - There is so much in life to be enjoyed so I intend to make the most of it!

I suffer from tinnitus and have a hearing loss which is not serious/ I can see that many people feel very alone with those around them not understanding what they are going through.

My attitude is that we're all going to die of something - I'm 77 - and I'll find a way of enjoying life regardless until I drop dead.

Best wishes to you all.

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NMGIBBS said on 20 March 2012

My husband has been told that he possiblt has this condition. He has suffered from sever dizziness, so much that he cannot get off the floor and is violently sick. He has been prescribed SERC8 but has become very tired, can anyone tell me if the tablets cause tiredness or is it just the condition? He doesnt want to stop taking them as he doesnt want another attack.

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NMGIBBS said on 20 March 2012

My husband has been told that he possiblt has this condition. He has suffered from sever dizziness, so much that he cannot get off the floor and is violently sick. He has been prescribed SERC8 but has become very tired, can anyone tell me if the tablets cause tiredness or is it just the condition? He doesnt want to stop taking them as he doesnt want another attack.

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charleychalk said on 11 January 2012

I have ready many comments on here and feel there are so many people all feeling like i do. I have had meneries for 10 years now although only just had it diagnosed after a long battle with my ent department. I now wear hearing aids in both ears and suffer with it in both ears and live with the constant fuzzy head and noises in my ears which in itself is enough to get anyone down. I am currently having a really hard time with the vertigo again after only going about 6 weeks from my last attack. I take Serc but that does not do miracles and may make the attacks less severe but don't take them away. Sometimes i feel very alone with this disease as unless you live with the fear of never knowing when its going to catch you out you can't ever begin to understand it. I too have had anti depresnts and sometimes i don't feel strong enough to beat it but i know if i give in to it i would become a recluse and for my family i keep going. Im 44 and i do worry how this will effect me as i get older and also my job as like many others i have had time sick from work. It is so nice to be able to share my experience with others even though it won't cure me but it makes me feel so less on my own with this i am

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solitaire sr said on 19 December 2011

Hi all, Im 32 and have had menieres disease for over 21 years.
My first ever attack i was 11 and i fell to the floor whilst at the stables with everything spinnig around me, of course i hadnt a clue what is was and i was terrified i can remember it all like it was yesterday.
Anyway i had regular attacks throughout my childhood and after several tests, mri scans, etc, i was diagnosed with menieres disease aged 15 years.
I had a great childhood and competed at shows with my horses but MD was always there.
My last major attack of MD was 4 years ago, i was at work as a carer, and i had only my second drop attack, it was terrifying, my work colleaugues phoned an ambulance as i was unable to explain what was happening. Iwas taken to hospital wher i was given an injection to stop the naseau i wa later released, and went home, wherwe i curled up on the sofa and slet for nearly 20 hours. I was ok a couple of days later, but MD was always there.
Its such a debilitating disease and makes life at times impossible.
I get scared as i have a 9 year old daughter and the other day i had an attack which made me unable to get out of bed, so i called her grandad to take her to school. With also having 4 horses i had to rely on friends to look after them for a couple of days.
I started again with symptons around 2 months ago now just the usual feeling sick, fullness in ears and head feeling very heavy.
I just wish someone had a majic wand to make it dissapear.
When people ask do i know when its coming my true answer is no. As at some part of the day i will feel one if not all of the above mentioned symptons.
I have been on cyclizine for several years that seems to have kept it at bay, but unfortunately i dont think it will ever go away.
I am told that i have both ears affected.
I suffer regularly from tinnitus and i become very sensitive to even the slightest noise, which can make me snappy, as to other people its a little noise but to me every noise makes me jump.
katie x

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Pelo said on 08 September 2011

Hi all, I was diagnosed with menieres disease 15 years ago when I was 21. When I was first diagnosed I was suffering from 3-4 drop attacks a week, which would normally last around 10 hrs, with severe vomiting and loose bowels for up to 5 hrs. This continued for a couple of years, I was prescribed numerous drugs including, serc, sturgeron, stemetol injections and tablet form.

Six months before I was due to get married I went to see my consultant and begged him to do something drastic, I couldn't imagine getting through my wedding day without an attack. He agreed to place a grommit in my affected ear!

This was 13 years ago, I very rarely have attacks, although I am suffering today. So far this one has lasted for 14 hrs, I don't suffer from vomiting anymore or loose bowells, but I still just have to stay in bed.

There is hope out there, I didn't think I'd get through this when I was first diagnosed, but it does get better.

To date I have had around 7 operations for new grommits, these have saved me and cannot explain what a difference they have made to my life.

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Hanbel said on 20 July 2011

I have had meniere's disease for about 4 years now and each year the attacks seem to get worse, this year has been really bad, i've had alot of time off sick. I am currently off sick as i have an infection of the ear canal, which is making meniere's impossible to cope with, the pain is chronic in my head, neck and jaw, im in so much pain that the doctor was considering putting me on morphine. Because of the menier's the symptoms have just about exploded, i can't walk or stand or do anything with out feeling i am falling over and im so sick with it too.
However yesterday my manager called me and is threatening to sack me if i dont go back to work by the end of this week even though the doctor has signed me off until the end of next week.
My manager thinks im making things up and that im always ill and should be at work even if im ill, just because i have an 'invisible' illness she thinks there is nothing wrong with me. She wants me in a meeting on Monday, and im so worried that im going to loose my job, though i have sought advice from my friendwho is a doctor who says legally they cannot sack me for being sick especially with an outlined medical condition.
Surely its discrimination!! to sack someone with a disability!!?
Does anyone have any advice?

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Brummygirl said on 01 June 2011

Hi- wanted to add my comments as xxprincess was so concerned. I am 45 and diagnosed as having full blown Menieres in 1972, aged 6. Took a year to diagnose during which I had weekly attacks which required hospitalisation as I got dehydrated and required drips. My attacks were typically at the end of a week with giddy head spinning, splitting migraine with accompanying visual disturbances , vomiting and inability to sit up, let alone anything else.

I was put on stugeron (travel sickness tablets) and these worked for the best part with intermittent (twice a year) attacks until the dosage was correct .

The good news for me is that as an adult I only suffer onset warming attacks (Migraine , tinnitus and feeling giddy) which painkillers and an extra stugeron seem to prevent a full attack. So it is worth that day of feeling "drugged up" in order to avoid the full attack. The only proper attacks I have had post aged 18 were due to reduced dosage during pregnancy and the labours themselves which were obviously too exciting/stressful and caused the full-blown variety.! Since then(touch wood) I have reverted to an occasional "off day" which the above dosing up has resolved.

So, there is good news out there. You can have kiddies depending on your medication(took me 6 years to get dosage down to "safe" levels) and the thought of not being able to parent is not applicable. I hold down a professional job and lead a full life. I have got to the stage where physically I do stretch myself occasionally, but still won't dive under water as the pressure gets me, have been advised not to ski, but do drive, do cycle , swim etc..

There does seem to be a genetic link in my case as my mother has a "milder" form with which she copes but again, long gaps between attacks. Neither of my children have developed symptoms.

Hope this gives people understanding that Menieres has a range of impact and that severe attacks can abate

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snuffer said on 04 April 2011

Ive had Menieres for 5 years now, and still suffer regular attacks on a daily basis they range from the quick ones where I lose my balance but recover quickly to the full blown drop attack, these often last for many hours but also some days at a time, at the end of which im left feeling washed out. I was lucky in my diagnosis as my mother has menieres so the doctors had something to work with. The disease is a blight on my life, and the embarrassment off collapsing in the middle of towns, supermarkets is hard to bear at times made even worse as im 6 ft 1 tall and of large build so many people just pass me by usually with the comment of "drunk at this time of day".
People who dont know about the disease just cant comprehend the effect that it has on you from the loss of hearing, balance and the continuos high pitched whistling that feels like its in the middle of your head makes sleeping hard
I tried returning to work but it lasted less than a week due to environmental factors with in the work place, does any body else suffer from this i.e. reflections, long corridors etc .
On the bright side im pretty good at telling when its going to rain , I hate winters with all the low pressure weather systems zipping in.
Sympathy to all out there with little understood and often frowned at disease.

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sophie_j said on 03 March 2011

Hi everyone, i have already wrote on here but i cant see it? anyway i was diagnosed with this menieres disease when i was lust 13!! this was extremlly rare.
It all started when i was studying for my GCSE's in school, i would cover over all dizzy and light headed. I depesertly wanted to run to the toilet but i couldnt move let alone walk! swaying down the corriodrs throwing up everywhere was so embaressing because people thought i was drunk or on drugs!
I was sent home, i was sick for about an hour consintly and then i would sleep for hours and hours unable to be woken. After varuois tests at hospital including hearing test, spinning test, MRI scan it was diagnosed. This seroiulsy affected my learning.
Im 21 now and over the last 7 years i have sufferd with bouts of "attacks" that last between 1-2 hours to 3-4 days, i can only hear a dumb echoy noise in my left here and can not walk in a straight line !! Cant ride a bike and cant balance on anything to save my life!!
I work in a bank and my emplyers have been ok with my time off but im affraid as i get older im getting "attacks" more and i dont want to lose my job, im affraid of having a drop attack in public because i look drunk or on drugs!
I live in a hazzy world with people who get extremlly fustrated with me because im so clumsy and apparently i dont listen (no i just cant hear you talk to the right ear) i explain to people that it feels like youv had that one drink to many and you need to stay still or all hell breaks loose inside my little head! my vision is sometime distorted when my left eye shudders. I do not drink alcohol the last time i did was when i was 17 and ended up in bed for a week after 2 glasses of wine! I have a low salt intake and rarely smoke! People dont get it and it makes me feel like im being daft and i need to get over myself, im glad you lot suffer the same as me and its not just me!
This hasnt ruined my life yet, i pray it dosent!
Sophie XX

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sophie_j said on 03 March 2011

caring on.......

I dont think people understand i fear of drop attacks in public beacuse people do think ur drunk or on drugs.
I live in a hazzy world of strange noises, no balance, my left eye seems to shudder from time to time distorting my vision. I do still go out from time to time but if im in a loud enviroment for prolonged times i become serisouly disorientated.

Reading these comments has helped me think that im not being silly and what im expreicening is because of this syndrome, it hasnt ruined my life yet and i pary it dont !!
Sophie xx

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sophie_j said on 03 March 2011

Hi everyone,
I was diagnosed with menieres disease when i was only 13!!! this was extremly rare, i was studing my GCSE's and kept coming over rather light headed, when i tried to move/walk i just couldnt without being sick! This was really embaressing as i was in school and throwing up all down the corridor trying ot get to the loo, alot of people that i saw when i was having an "attack" said it looked as if i was drunk. I got into alot of trouble and my dad was called, i tried to explain that i wasnt drunk but could hardly speak any sense! when we returned home i was violently sick for about 2 hours and then slept for round about 5-6 hours and couldnt be waked. This sreously affected my learing!!

I was refferd to a unit that deasl with inner ear cases at a privert hospital, i had varouis test, hearing test, spinning test, MRI scans (it was getting scary now). Finaly the doctor diagnosed meneieres disease, he went on to say this was extremly rare in someone so young!! He didnt really tell me why or how?

All i hear in my left ear is a dumb echoy noise and i cant stand on one leg! I cant ride a bike now or walk in a striaght line.
I am now 21 and over the 7 years iv sufferd with attacks lasting 30 miniutes to 2 weeks!! stremacell was helping but it dosent seem to do much now.
I dont drink alchol because i cant, the last drink i had was on my 17th birthday and then spent 1 week in bed after 2 glasses of wine!!! I avoid high salt content and rarely smoke, the one thing iv notcied over the years is that STRESS is one of the main causes of my attacks, buts it soo hard to live a stress free life or is it am i doing something majorly wrong? I work in a bank and are propelly coming close to loseing my job as i have been ill all this year, my immune system has seemd to have left my body and i catch every bug going!!

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xxprincessjo78xx said on 31 January 2011

hi everyone

i was diagnosed this morning, but in retrospect have prob suffered for a number of years, although was told it was labyrithitis on the previous occasions. can anyone give me an idea of how this is going to affect me, i'm really worried, am studying to become a health professinal and only have 1 year to go until i qualify, i read the posts and understand some of you guys have lost your jobs. i'v fought tooth and nail to get on this course and worked hard to stay on it, am i panicking? can they make me leave? omg i'm sorry guys but i'm currently off sick following the second bout of this in two weeks and i'm worried of the effects its going to have

also i have kids, will this affect my parenting? as you can see quickly losing the plot

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Doodlebodd said on 28 December 2010

.....DOES make you that ill,a nd that you cannot guarantee being ok for another appointment. You are met with snotty snorts and/or laughter as they book you in for another day or time. God forbid you should wake with vertigo that day too, or feel an attack looming very near....It is the end of the world for you to miss another appointment and although you call in again (you live alone you see) they still write very short, snotty letters to your GP telling him you Did Not Attend (DNA'd) whilst forgetting to mention that you did however call them up both times and stated you were ill with the same thing both times!...So of course you're GP is pretty annoyed that you DNA'd and gets annoyed by you keep going in n out of his office complaining you're bad again.......


Taking of 'p*******d' .....You may of course be out one day, and have the most luck in the world and look only 18 yrs old (if that) despite being thirty years of age! Oh dear, you've not always felt attacks coming on but ones starting to flare up right there and then. You wobble and stumble and weave in and out and into people of course looking like you've had about ten pints of beer. People say nasty things to you, they stare, shout, go to start fights with you and well...No one wants to listen to a 'young, teenager' explain why they are not infact drunk in public, oh no, they have thier say, or threats, or even go to hit you and you stand for it all and look like the worse person ion the world.

You then have to get home somehow and crawl upstairs to your little flat because the Council dont believe Menieres is 'that' bad because some of their support workers have spoken to some old woman down the road who has had Menieres for years and has never described the things I tell them happen to me as happening to her, so of course I'm lying and they wont move me to a ground floor property out of the way, for my own SAFETY!

Then of course, if you suffer with other problems, your Menieres disease.......

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Doodlebodd said on 28 December 2010

.....DOES make you that ill,a nd that you cannot guarantee being ok for another appointment. You are met with snotty snorts and/or laughter as they book you in for another day or time. God forbid you should wake with vertigo that day too, or feel an attack looming very near....It is the end of the world for you to miss another appointment and although you call in again (you live alone you see) they still write very short, snotty letters to your GP telling him you Did Not Attend (DNA'd) whilst forgetting to mention that you did however call them up both times and stated you were ill with the same thing both times!...So of course you're GP is pretty annoyed that you DNA'd and gets annoyed by you keep going in n out of his office complaining you're bad again.......


Taking of 'p*******d' .....You may of course be out one day, and have the most luck in the world and look only 18 yrs old (if that) despite being thirty years of age! Oh dear, you've not always felt attacks coming on but ones starting to flare up right there and then. You wobble and stumble and weave in and out and into people of course looking like you've had about ten pints of beer. People say nasty things to you, they stare, shout, go to start fights with you and well...No one wants to listen to a 'young, teenager' explain why they are not infact drunk in public, oh no, they have thier say, or threats, or even go to hit you and you stand for it all and look like the worse person ion the world.

You then have to get home somehow and crawl upstairs to your little flat because the Council dont believe Menieres is 'that' bad because some of their support workers have spoken to some old woman down the road who has had Menieres for years and has never described the things I tell them happen to me as happening to her, so of course I'm lying and they wont move me to a ground floor property out of the way, for my own SAFETY!

Then of course, if you suffer with other problems, your Menieres disease.......

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Doodlebodd said on 28 December 2010

....so you have to use a jug which is ok but you cant really stop the water going into your face, mouth, ears and eyes because you cant tilt your head back either so you've to put up with the disorientated part for a while n hope it doesn't set off a full blown vertigo attack off.

Then you need to wash, again you cant move too much n cant really go getting up n down without the possibility of puking, falling down n or setting of a vertigo attack. But somehow you SLOWLY manage to get washed n get up out of the bath to dry yourself if you can, or sit there and wait for parts of you to dry that you know you cant bend down to without being ill.

You maybe need the loo...maybe a bit constipated one day, because someone maybe told you that Menieres was due to too much fluid in your ear so you are scared to drink much because you dont want to be in bed puking all day, usually on a nice sunny day in my case too.

So you struggle with getting your bottom half sorted and then try to take a dump.....But oh no, you lean forwards or try a little gentle nudging with a bit of a squeeze n a strain and oh dear, you fall off the loo, puke, or have to crawl to the nearest thing you can get to so that you can lie down n sleep until the attack has gone, but wait, you wake up n you're still spinning n start hurling again.

Maybe you have a cold, and OMG you sneeze of all things, off goes the Tinitus majorly loud, rattling through your head n ears n you might fall down, might manage to stay up but have to wait Lord knows how long to stop being dizzy if you're lucky n havent set off a vertigo attack that is!

Maybe one day you have a hospital appointment for something else but you wake up dizzy or with vertigo, you still, somehow manage to call in and say you cant move, why? Because you have Menieres...'OH ok then, cant they do anything?' or 'Whats that, an ear thing isn't it, oh no that wouldn't make you that ill' n you still try to explain without moving too much that it..

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Doodlebodd said on 28 December 2010

... and then it starts all over again. I am only just 30 yrs old now so people tend to play Menieres Down even though thats what my one ENT says is going on, but another isn't sure!

Leading up to an attack has a daily battle for you to fight so I think I'll enlighten some of those who might come here looking for info on Menieres and the problems it causes....

Waking up, so long as you havent slept on your bad side and wake up with the room moving round and round that is, you can slowly sit up but be careful as you might fall out of bed by thinking your in an ok position but youre not.

You want to shower, or do you bathe...You see for me I cannot stand certain noises as they tend to make me really dizzy and I sometimes fall down because of the noises. In the shower because the water gets in your ears more and the sound gets cut off and you shut your eyes as you wash your hair etc you tend to get VERY disorientated and can easilly fall down or fall out of the shower or into the wall or out into the shower curtain....So knowing all this you decide for a bath.

But wait...You have to bend down to put the plug in the plug hole which can make you fall forwards into the bath because when you bend down you go dizzy, but you get over that eventually and run the water, but wait, the noise of the water makes you feel horrible too and you possibly fall down or feel very dizzy from it, but you have to bath or shower, and in the bath at least you're not standing the whole time with water going in your eyes and ears and are less likely to fall down.

So you manage to fill the bath and manage to get undressed without bending down too much and you slowly get into the bath but making sure that the water does not move alot because you get the seasick feeling when the water rocks you a bit because you are overweight and it makes the water move against you.

You then want to wash your hair but cant lie back else all merry hell breaks out and you will probably hurl.....

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Doodlebodd said on 28 December 2010

My first ever comment on this shole site so bare with me....

There is still some debate over if I have Menieres Disease or not but most likely as I suffered what was thought to be mumps when I was 24 back in 2005. I went to bed one night in terrible pain all over and a swollen face/neck and woke up the next day with complete deafness in my left ear.

Only now years after this have I started to get episodes of what started as just really bad dizzy attacks, that over time got more severe and more intense.

The GP told me it was vertigo because it started to be so bad I would vomit until it stopped. The attacks I last had were over fifteen hours long and I'd literally be stuck in my bed not even being able to turn over or get out for the loo. The vomitting I get affects my stomach as I have a stomach acid problem too.

The amount of vomitting I had/have to endure has caused my stomach to start bleeding pretty soon after I start hurling and life inbetween attacks is not much fun.

The hearing in my good ear now dips on and off at any time it likes and the Tinitus I suffer with constantly in my ears gets worse with every 'dip' making it even harder to hear people. I feel the attacks brewing usually and rarely get a day where I can have no ballance problems at all.

At one point my attacks were every week, getting worse each time in duraion and sickness, then at times because of my stomach bleeding, if my vertigo had stopped the sickness wouldn't and I've had to be admitted once because I just could not stop hurling anything I ate up without it being black or brown, or red blood coming up.

I can get very tired coming up to an attack and very distressed, I stumble, fall, can bend down, lean forwards, lean to the sides, nor can I look at bright screens in this 'phase' of leading up to an attack which can last days and days, then you have the attack itself and it can take a few days to settle down but by that time you can feel another attack coming on..

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Doodlebodd said on 28 December 2010

My first ever comment on this shole site so bare with me....

There is still some debate over if I have Menieres Disease or not but most likely as I suffered what was thought to be mumps when I was 24 back in 2005. I went to bed one night in terrible pain all over and a swollen face/neck and woke up the next day with complete deafness in my left ear.

Only now years after this have I started to get episodes of what started as just really bad dizzy attacks, that over time got more severe and more intense.

The GP told me it was vertigo because it started to be so bad I would vomit until it stopped. The attacks I last had were over fifteen hours long and I'd literally be stuck in my bed not even being able to turn over or get out for the loo. The vomitting I get affects my stomach as I have a stomach acid problem too.

The amount of vomitting I had/have to endure has caused my stomach to start bleeding pretty soon after I start hurling and life inbetween attacks is not much fun.

The hearing in my good ear now dips on and off at any time it likes and the Tinitus I suffer with constantly in my ears gets worse with every 'dip' making it even harder to hear people. I feel the attacks brewing usually and rarely get a day where I can have no ballance problems at all.

At one point my attacks were every week, getting worse each time in duraion and sickness, then at times because of my stomach bleeding, if my vertigo had stopped the sickness wouldn't and I've had to be admitted once because I just could not stop hurling anything I ate up without it being black or brown, or red blood coming up.

I can get very tired coming up to an attack and very distressed, I stumble, fall, can bend down, lean forwards, lean to the sides, nor can I look at bright screens in this 'phase' of leading up to an attack which can last days and days, then you have the attack itself and it can take a few days to settle down but by that time you can feel another attack coming on..

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Blayde said on 06 December 2010

I've been having episodes of dizziness for the last year or so. These usually last about two to three days for me to completely recover. I'm 38 and have hearing loss in my right ear and have had minor tiniitus for several years. My doctor prescribed prochloroperazine to help alleviate the symptoms but this has not really helped during this last episode during the last two days. I just talked to my doctor and he says I'm too young but some websites say it can occur from the age of 30. I get worried that my boss doesn't realize just how bad the dizziness / vertigo is and that they will tell me they will stop paying my sick days in future. I can't even lay down flat. It doesn't help that my job is 70 miles away so the idea of driving 70 miles each way while suffering from dizziness and feeling sick is not my idea of a good time. Everyone who suffers from this has my sincere empathy.

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devon dumpling said on 19 November 2010

I don't think Pinky dust meant that you were making light of Menieres, rather that the NHS Choices introduction didn't get across just how debilitating Menieres is and the affect it has on our daily lives. Most "experts" seem to be of the opinion that between the actual vertigo attacks we can live a normal life....if only!!
I have been officially diagnosed for two years but have had menieres for ten years or so. Initially I did enjoy long periods of remission but during the last two years it's been pretty constant. I've lost my job, suffer with permanent balance problems and falls, had failed grommet/steroid ops and now hardly leave the house alone.
I have found great support and invaluable advice on an online Menieres forum - MDUK.org - and suggest anyone with this awful condition joins if they've not already done so.
I don't think anyone truly understands what it's like trying to deal with menieres unless they are a sufferer themselves or live with someone who is.

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mollys life said on 16 November 2010

If any of you think that I make "Light" of this awful condition then think again mate. I have suffered and I have suffered to the point where I have felt life is not living. So dont hand that one on me and who gives a damn what they call it mate. Its the same if you have it bad whatever name you hang on it. That s just petty. You talk about being in door days after an attack. Well I have been in bed this year practically the whole summer unable even to take myself to the toilet so I believe I have a right to state my case and put what ever spin on it I like. But never do I make light of a condition that has ruined my career and much more. Read it again mate and digest. I continue to suffer and am facing a serious operation to correct a gentamicin top up so if thats what you call making light - well forget it and if you look at a number of professional journals you will see even on this site it is referred to as MD but quite franky who gives a damn what its called its a horrible dibilitaitng condition full stop.

I consider it to be a good thing to be up-beat and not let this take over. Life is tough and yeah you have to fight for a lot of things. But blah blahing about what its called MD or MS who cares mate not me!!. have a good one pal

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PiskyDust said on 16 November 2010

This article makes light of the condition. I had to fight to be properly tested and diagnosed, and Meniere's is effecting just about every aspect of my life. It can take me a week or more to recover from a bad attack, and even when I'm not dizzy, I struggle constantly with brain fog, etc, and the heraring problems are absolutely terrible. The only advice I was given at my hospital was 'avoid noisy environments'; that would basically mean not leaving the house!

Also, I wish people would stop calling Meniere's a disease. It isn't a diesease, it can't be caught or passed on. It's a syndrome.

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mollys life said on 12 November 2010

I was very interested to read your experiences and difficulties with this disease or syndrome as they now call it. I read somewhere on the NHS site of a lady who had deafness and tinitus - well excuse me but if thats all she had well consider yourself lucky thats what I say. This condition if you have the full blown variety as I do has stripped me of my legal career, my dignity, my self worth and very nearly my partner. It has given me, depression, anxiety, agraphobia, panic attacks and many more other symptoms that are so awful I just cannot put into words. However I read what David Bradwell had to say and ok its time to fight back. No more afraid to go out in case of an attack. In fact I had a drop attack in Morristons two weeks ago. I felt terrible but I dont care now. Its worse for me than them so I take his point. Its bad but it has to be better than staying indoors frightened to venture out or have any life. So like him I'm, putting two fingers up to the old MD and fighting back and I am going to write a practical no frills book about my experiences good and bad. And believe me there have been some megga bad times. Well you all know that.
My motto now is onwards and upwards. I have been down there and its not nice. Dont let this ruin your life as I did for ten years. I had a remission for a while which was brilliant but its always lerking in the background. I am not going to worry about this anymore I am just carrying on with life making sure I am safe with a few backup measures yeah!!!
Oh I forgot to say I had a gentamicin top up in sept and something went wrong and now I am facing a not insignificant operation to release either fluid or infection from my middle ear via the mastoid bone!!!Oh life just gets better!!!!!!!!!!

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mollys life said on 02 November 2010

Hi all I have had this awful MD for nearly ten years! I had a gentamicin top up (My third) in Sept and something has gone wrong and I have ended up for weeks in bed lying and vomiting. Well you know. I am now taking Arlevert which is helping but making me drowsy all the time. To be honest this disease has made me a nervous wreck. Always worried when out and about just in case. When will it ever end. Its supposed to burn out yeah! Anyway I lost my job -retired me off as an embarassment! I am now writing a book on this condition. I dont know maybe it will help someone out there? or maybe just me. Anyway its sorta therapy for me. I used to be a professional woman with a great career and now I'm sitting at home watching day time tv and I have got to get out there again and not let this thing kill the rest of my life. Its taken my career, my self confidence, my hearing, my social life and very nearly my partner. I have had panick attacks you name it I've had it and all under the heading MD. Why isnt anyone out there doing research for gods sake! There are so many people in this country and around the world who have this condition. If I finish this book and sell it I would happily donate all royalties to research without a second thought. Any thoughts? any info on current research...please?

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Commander Phil said on 26 October 2010

I had my first attack of extreme vertigo in October 2009. I was spinning for nearly 2 days, couldn't walk or even get out of bed for the loo without help. i was constantly being sick until my whole body was sore. I ended up in hospital. The unbalance subsided after about a month. then, out of the blue another sudden attack ... more sickness this time for about 8 hours. I started to feel better after about a week. Then the Tinnitus started along with severe hearing loss in my right ear. I became extremely depressed.

Now I have beaten the depression and I am coping well with feeling like i'm constantly walking on a ship and the hideous tinnitus that sounds like an electric guitar feeding back. How have I done it? by listening to meditation tapes and through deep relaxation, accepting and learning to "be comfortable" with my symptoms.I listen to a cd of white noise to get to sleep. If I wake in the night I put it on again. I never avoid anything. If you fall over in Sainsbury's ... so what some one will pick you up! It's tough, but you CAN find a way of fitting this poorly understood condition into your life without it driving you to insanity. If you can just find the way to accept that this is the way you are now and focus on all the things that you can still do.

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melis_mary said on 23 October 2010

I was diagnosed with this disease in 2006 although I had it for years before. I was sent to an ENT specialist feeling dizzy, feeling sick and actually being sick. I was put on a diuretic until I asked to change medication. I now take Serc - 48mg a day, I also take amitriptyline when needed to help me sleep. I have major loss of hearing in my left ear, and the tinnitus drives me crazy. It sounds like a diesel engine running!
I haven't had a bad attack for nearly a year now, but the last attack i had lasted for 3 weeks. I couldn't eat a lot, I just slept really.
I know how you all feel.

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nannalyn said on 21 October 2010

I was diagnosed with this disease last week and it has got to be the most depilitating illness to deal with as it comes on so quickly that you cannot live your life as you would want to for fear that you will have an attack at any time. I find that when one of these attacks comes on the answer for me is to go straight to bed and lay on my right side and to keep my eyes closed regardless of if I am being sick which I usually am I also have no control of my bodily funcations as in bowels and urinating which also occurs along side these attacks.This attack will last up to 2-8 hours and I just sleep. When these attacks have finished I feel absolutely drained and fearful for when the attack will happen again. I am waiting to be seen by someone at hospital to go on a balancing program. I hope that this will help me. My GP has tried various medications and the one that suits me is Cyclizine 50mg 3 times a day although I only take two per day. The ENT specialist wanted me to take SERC8 but this had a very bad effect on me. I am waiting for a follow-up in January to see how I am progressing. To all fellow suffers you have my sympathy and unless you have had this disease in my opinion consider yourself very lucky.

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paula44 said on 04 October 2010

This disease is overtaking my life at the moment even though i am trying to manage it! I am currently taking Serc and a directic which is helping, but it doesnt stop the headaches. I am due to have some balance training and an hearing aid fitted but everything is taking so long through the waiting lists on the NHS. I do have support through a therapist through the NHS who is helping me with the tinnitus problems and refering me to the various departments for help. I have had this disease for a number of years and it affects my left ear. I am finding i am taking alot of time of work which is stressful as i know at some point i will have to giveup or they will retire me with ill health! However, i am trying to learn to meditate as apparently this can help and trying to find a local support group where i could meetup with other people who have this disease and or start one!

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debs1961 said on 02 September 2010

I haven't been diagnosed yet I am just waiting for my emergency appointment with ENT. I started getting the tinnitus in late 2008. In early 2010 I had a strange feeling in my right ear like someone had shoved a cotton wool ball in there. Recently within the last 28 days my life has come to a stand still, I feel dizzy almost all of the time and feel very disjointed. I have had a problem with my blood pressure something that is very unusual for myself, it has always been average. It has gone up on many occasions now and is making me feel very unwell. I haven't been out much unless it's to go to the Hospital or my Doctors because of the horrible feeling of something bad happening due to the symptoms. It is a horrible disease. I have read many articles online and see that there is no cure, but there is a lot that can be done to keep it under control. This is a comfort to me and hope that with my diagnosis I will be able to cope with it a little better.

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David_Bradwell said on 15 August 2010

I had my first attack in 1985 and found it very disturbing. As a result of the Meniere's I have lost most of the hearing in my left ear and have constant Tinnitus in that ear. I consider myself very lucky to only be affected in one ear as the Tinnitus can be very stressful. Seeing the remarks about it being related to the pressure in the inner ear I believe this to be true as a few months after my first attack I went up in a light aircraft and found that above approx 1,000 feet the Tinnitus cleared completely and I was able to hear as well in my left ear as in my right (which was not affected by the condition). Up until about 3 months ago I had not had any vertigo for at least 10 years but have now had 3 attacks in the last 3 months, 2 of which have been in the last week and the last one (yesterday) happened after taking Prochlorperazine 5mg 3 times a day since Monday 9th August. I am hoping this is not a sign that the attacks are going to become more frequent as I get older. Anyone who suffers with this knows how worrying and debilitating it can be.

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