When are vaccinations given?

Most vaccinations are given during childhood. Some are given more than once to make sure the protection is effective and continues. Vaccinations may be given at different times depending on when they're needed.

Childhood vaccinations

The recommended timetable for childhood vaccinations is shown below. For more general information, see about vaccinations.

At two months old:

At three months old:

  • diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) – one injection
  • meningitis C (meningococcal group C, MenC) – one injection

At four months old:

  • diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) – one injection
  • pneumococcal infections (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV) – one injection
  • meningitis C (meningococcal group C or MenC) – one injection

Between 12 and 13 months old:

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) – one injection
  • pneumococcal infections (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV) – one injection
  • measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) – one injection

Three years four months old to five years old:

  • diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (DTaP/IPV or dTaP/IPV) – one injection
  • measles, mumps and rubella (German measles or MMR) – one injection

Around 12 to 13 years old:

  • HPV vaccine – three injections for girls only, ideally given over a period of six months, although they can all be given over a period of 12 months

Between 13 and 18 years old:

  • diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV) – one injection

Vaccinations for older people

People who are 65 or over also need some vaccinations: 

Other vaccinations

Other vaccinations are given in some situations – for example, to:

  • people at risk of complications if they develop the condition
  • healthcare workers who may come into contact with the disease
  • those at increased risk of contracting certain diseases, such as hepatitis

These vaccinations include:

When should I get travel vaccinations?

Vaccinations may also be necessary for people travelling to areas where there may be serious diseases, such as typhoid or yellow fever. Some need to be given well in advance so that they can work properly.

For more information, see Which vaccinations do I need to travel abroad?

You can also get a personalised, printable vaccination planner of your child's vaccinations based on their date of birth.

Read the answers to more questions about vaccinations.

Further information:

Page last reviewed: 11/11/2012

Next review due: 10/11/2014