Being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 

People are most often diagnosed with multiple sclerosis or MS between the ages of 20 and 40. Everyone reacts differently to diagnosis. In this video people with MS talk about how they responded to their diagnosis.

Read more about how multiple sclerosis is diagnosed

Transcript of Being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis

MS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY

PEOPLE ARE MOST OFTEN DIAGNOSED BETWEEN 20 and 40.

I don't think there was anything at all wrong with me.

I was quite young, 26.

Working a pretty stressful job in a newsroom

and you know, burning the candle at both ends.

I had a loss of sensation in my leg

which by GP put down to a trapped nerve.

I had problems with my balance. I started getting pains in my legs.

I didn't smoke, didn't drink too much.

They said, "There's something wrong here."

EVERYONE REACTS TO DIAGNOSIS DIFFERENTLY

I think when you're newly diagnosed, you're not ready for so much of it.

You can't be.

There was fear.

Because I had heard nothing about MS before that.

My response was actually quite positive, believe it or not.

Because finally, I had all these stupid things people were like,

"What's wrong with you today?"

All of a sudden it made sense.

I was angry, I was upset.

I was depressed.

I didn't want to talk to anybody.

I came out of the doctor's room

and just felt absolutely devastated.

SUPPORT IS THERE TO HELP YOU WITH YOUR DIAGNOSIS

IF YOU NEED IT

People, they're not aware of just how much help is actually available.

I could pick up the phone and can phone the helpline.

The first newly diagnosed group I went to was run by the society.

I got a lot out of it.

One of the greatest support mechanisms is the multi-disciplinary MS Team

and obviously, those are headed up by the MS nurses.

The MS Society also have great books and publications.

I'd probably say, although it will sound weird,

don't read too much

because too much information can make it overwhelming.

Honestly, the MS Society was a huge support when I was diagnosed.

That was the main website that I used to go on.

My wife and family have helped me through it and helped me to cope.

I have a lot of good friends.

A lot of good people I've met through the therapy centres I've attended.

The support is out there, you just have to ask for it.

MS is in my life, I can't do anything about that.

You manage it.

You learn to live a full, happy, decent life.

You have to try and be positive

and concentrate on the things that you can do

and not worry about the things you can't do.

I knew it wasn't a death sentence.

Life hasn't stopped for me. Life does carry on.

I embrace my Ns. This is part of who I am.

The freephone MS Society helpline is available weekdays 9:00am to 9:00pm.

On 0808 800 8000.

That's 0808 800 8000.

Or you can email helpline@mssociety.org.uk.

WWW.MSSOCIETY.ORG.UK

Ratings

How helpful is this page?

Average rating

Based on 1 ratings

All ratings

Add your rating

What is care and support?

Find out how care and support can help if you have extra needs because you are disabled, have a long-term condition or are elderly

Guide to caring

Need caring advice? Read our guide to everything you need to know about looking after an ill or disabled relative