Brain tours: introduction to the brain 

The human brain is incredibly complex. It controls everything our body does, from co-ordinating our movements and our speech, keeping our heart beating and storing our memories.

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Transcript of Brain tours: introduction to the brain

An introduction to the brain.

The human brain is incredibly complex.

It controls everything our body does,

from co-ordinating our movements and our speech,

to keeping our heart beating and storing our memories.

Despite all this, there is still a lot we don't know

and much of the brain's inners workings are a mystery.

The average human brain weighs around 1.5 kilograms.

It's fed by a network of blood vessels

that provide the brain cells with oxygen and nutrients.

The brain can be divided into four main sections.

The cerebral cortex,

which is split into two symmetrical cerebral hemispheres,

the limbic system, the cerebellum and the brain stem.

The bulk of the brain is a symmetrical cerebral cortex.

Each cerebral hemisphere is separated into four main lobes,

which have different functions.

The frontal lobe is responsible for decision-making,

problem-solving and planning.

The parietal lobe receives and processes

all the sensory information from the body.

The temporal lobe is responsible for memory, emotion, hearing and language.

The occipital lobe controls vision.

At the centre of the brain is the limbic system.

This area controls a number of functions,

but importantly controls learning and memory.

Particularly in the hippocampus.

The cerebellum, or little brain, controls movement posture and balance.

The brain stem, which is thought to be the oldest part of the brain,

controls basic life functions, like heartbeat, breathing and blood pressure.

Alzheimer's Society Leading The Fight Against Dementia

alzheimers.org.uk/braintour

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