Behind the Headlines

Your guide to the science that makes the news

Dry-roasted peanuts may be worst for nut allergies

Monday Sep 22 2014

Dry roasted peanuts worst for nut allergies

“Dry-roasted peanuts 'worst for allergies',” the Mail Online reports. New research involving mice suggests that the roasting process increases the 'allergic power' of peanuts. Researchers exposed mice to small amounts of proteins derived from either…

Do artificial sweeteners raise diabetes risk?

Thursday Sep 18 2014

Artificial sweeteners may actually raise diabetes risk

"Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes, claim scientists," reports The Guardian. But before you go clearing your fridge of diet colas, the research in question – extensive as it was – was mainly in mice…

Sugar intake guideline 'needs lowering'

Tuesday Sep 16 2014

Sugar intake guideline 'needs lowering'

"Sugar intake must be slashed further, say scientists," BBC News reports. A new study suggests that lowering the recommended limit to less than 3% would improve public dental health…

Weight discrimination study fuels debate

Friday Sep 12 2014

Research suggests "shaming" people about weight problems may be counterproductive

Much of the media has reported that discriminatory "fat shaming" makes people who are overweight eat more, rather than less. The Daily Mail describes how...

People may be addicted to eating rather than food

Thursday Sep 11 2014

People may be addicted to eating rather than food

“Food is not addictive ... but eating is: Gorging is psychological compulsion, say experts,” the Mail Online reports. The news follows an article in which scientists argue that – unlike drug addiction...

Missing breakfast linked to type 2 diabetes

Wednesday Sep 3 2014

Missing breakfast linked to type 2 diabetes

"Skipping breakfast in childhood may raise the risk of diabetes," the Mail Online reports. A study of UK schoolchildren found that those who didn’t regularly eat breakfast had early signs of having risk markers for type 2 diabetes...

Could watching action films make you fat?

Tuesday Sep 2 2014

Watching action films could be making you fat

“Couch potatoes captivated by fast-paced action films eat far more than those watching more sedate programmes,” The Independent reports. A small US study found that people snacked more when watching action-packed movies…

Brain can be ‘retrained’ to prefer healthy foods

Tuesday Sep 2 2014

Brains retrained to prefer healthier foods

“The brain can be trained to prefer healthy food over unhealthy high-calorie foods, using a diet which does not leave people hungry,” reports BBC News. It reports on a small pilot study involving 13 overweight and obese people…

Tomato rich diet 'reduces prostate cancer risk'

Thursday Aug 28 2014

Tomato rich diet reduces prostate cancer risk

“Tomatoes ‘cut risk of prostate cancer by 20%’,” the Daily Mail reports, citing a study that found men who ate 10 or more portions a week had a reduced risk of the disease. The study in question gathered a year’s dietary information…

Common bacteria could help prevent food allergies

Tuesday Aug 26 2014

Common bacteria could help prevent food allergies

"Bacteria which naturally live inside our digestive system can help prevent allergies and may become a source of treatment," BBC News reports after new research found evidence that Clostridia bacterium helps prevent peanut allergies in mice…

What is Behind the Headlines?

What is Behind the Headlines?

We give you the facts without the fiction. Professor Sir Muir Gray, founder of Behind the Headlines, explains more...

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