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The Care Quality Commission (CQC)

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The Care Quality Commission (CQC) makes sure hospitals, care homes, dental and GP surgeries, and all other care services in England provide people with safe, effective, compassionate and high quality care, and encourages these services to make improvements.

The CQC does this by inspecting services and publishing the results on its website to help you make better decisions about the care you receive.

For more information, visit How we do our job and Our inspections sections on the CQC website, or download the About CQC (PDF, 773kb) document.

Principles of the CQC

Throughout everything the CQC does, it always:

  • puts people who use services at the heart of its work
  • has an open and accessible culture
  • is independent, rigorous, fair and consistent
  • works in partnership across the health and social care system
  • is committed to being a high-performing organisation
  • promotes equality, diversity and human rights

How the CQC does its job

The CQC carries out its role in the following ways:

  • Setting national standards of quality and safety that people can expect whenever they receive care.
  • Registering care services that meet national standards.
  • Monitoring, inspecting and regulating care services to make sure they continue to meet the standards.
  • Protecting the rights of vulnerable people, including those whose rights are restricted under the Mental Health Act.
  • Listening to and acting on your experiences.
  • Involving people who use services.
  • Working in partnership with other organisations and local groups.
  • Challenging all providers, with the worst performers getting the most attention.
  • Making fair and authoritative judgements supported by the best information and evidence.
  • Taking appropriate action if care services are failing to meet the standards.
  • Carrying out in-depth investigations to look at care across the system.
  • Reporting on the quality of care services, publishing clear and comprehensive information, including performance ratings to help people choose care.

Comments

The 14 comments posted are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

veryconcerned said on 08 April 2014

I fully agree with Rosemary Cantwell's comment below (25 Feburary), especially the pieces I quote below:

"....By all means have private care providers helping the NHS but keep it all under central supervision and control.
I find that the NHS is not well-served by any of the regulators be it the Care Quality Commission, the PHSO, the General Medical Council, the Nursing Midwifery Council or the HCPC. We need to overhaul the entire system and just have one regulator for the entire NHS.
It could save billions of pounds if the Department of Health took back control of the NHS and the Secretary of State became personally responsible for the actions of all the NHS Trusts as he or she would then insist on proper regulation of each and every hospital, care commissioning group and healthcare trust."

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R1SE said on 25 February 2014

25 February 2014

Dear NHS Choices

I am concerned about the Regulators not regulating comprehensively.

If the Care Quality Commission had been properly working, would some of the mental health suicides have occurred?

Without naming individual trusts and individual circumstances, I am concerned lest the Care Quality Commission had "waived through" self-regulation of any mental health trust.

Why should any facility be allowed to "self-regulate"?

Surely there should be local people assisted by a local regulator to be on site at all time to ensure that proper processes and procedures are in place.

How else will we ever oversee the workings of such a giant monolith as the NHS?

I believe that when the NHS was originally run and controlled by the Secretary of State for Health and the Department of Health it was far superior, as there was just ONE set of policies for each eventuality whereas now there are thousands of policies and not consistent between all trusts.

How can we rescue the NHS?

Only by nationalising it and bringing it back into central control of the Department of Health I aver.

By all means have private care providers helping the NHS but keep it all under central supervision and control.

I find that the NHS is not well-served by any of the regulators be it the Care Quality Commission, the PHSO, the General Medical Council, the Nursing Midwifery Council or the HCPC. We need to overhaul the entire system and just have ONE regulator for the entire NHS.

It could save billions of pounds if the Department of Health took back control of the NHS and the Secretary of State became personally responsible for the actions of all the NHS Trusts as he or she would then insist on proper regulation of each and every hospital, care commissioning group and healthcare trust.

I can but hope.

Thank you very much.

Yours sincerely,

Rosemary Cantwell

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DiCC said on 25 January 2014

My 87 year old mother was referred by her GP for a neurological appointment. St Georges at Tooting sent her a letter with a date and a time, stating that she should NOT attend at this time. A phone number was provided for her to call which she duly did.
She was told to call back when the office opened at 11.10 a.m.
She called again and was told to call again the next day.
She left an answerphone message asking them to call her. She also called the hospital's appointment line. They were unable to make an appointment and told her to phone the neurosurgery department..
She called neurosurgery twice more. The recorded message said the department opened at 11.40 a.m.
She called again after 11.40 and was told to call again the next day at 11.30.
At this point she gave up. No one ever called her back.
Several days later she received a letter, with no indication of which hospital was involved, to say that as she had not booked her clinic appointment as advised, and that she should do so.
How complicated and impossible is this?
She has given up and believes that St George's is actively trying to make it too difficult for patients to access appointments.

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DiCC said on 25 January 2014

My 87 year old mother was referred by her GP for a neurological appointment. St Georges at Tooting sent her a letter with a date and a time, stating that she should NOT attend at this time. A phone number was provided for her to call which she duly did.
She was told to call back when the office opened at 11.10 a.m.
She called again and was told to call again the next day.
She left an answerphone message asking them to call her. She also called the hospital's appointment line. They were unable to make an appointment and told her to phone the neurosurgery department..
She called neurosurgery twice more. The recorded message said the department opened at 11.40 a.m.
She called again after 11.40 and was told to call again the next day at 11.30.
At this point she gave up. No one ever called her back.
Several days later she received a letter, with no indication of which hospital was involved, to say that as she had not booked her clinic appointment as advised, and that she should do so.
How complicated and impossible is this?
She has given up and believes that St George's is actively trying to make it too difficult for patients to access appointments.

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Beauthemuss said on 25 January 2014

I work nights in a care home and want to know if it's right that I have to get the residents up from 6 o'clock in the morning. I have no problem assisting the residents who are already awake but I'm finding it very hard having to wake others up who are fast asleep, then when the early shift start work at 7 there is staff who complain there's not enough residents up. I personally have looked through care plans and have not come across any resident wanting to be up this early and once they are up and have had a cup of tea they fall back to sleep in the chairs in the lounge surly it would be better to start getting the residents up at a better hour. Love the job but getting to involved I'm told maybe it's time to change jobs.

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Teddyz said on 10 January 2014

The article is misleading. It says the "CQC carries out its role in the following ways" - "Setting national standards of quality and safety".

I have asked the CQC if there was a minimum temperature for Nursing and Care Homes as my mother was being subject to cold temperatures of 17c at her Nursing Home. The reply I have received from the CQC says that they do not set national standards. All they do is enforce standards that are set by the Department of Health and if there is a missing standard it's the DoH's responsibility to change it.

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kafka42 said on 02 November 2013

Around the end of July, my GP made an appointment for my consultation with an orthopaedic specialist at Barnet Hospital.

I waited in pain for nearly three months as my appointment date was on 21 October.
Just two hours before my appointment I received a telephone message explaining that a mistake had been made: it was the wrong specialist, therefore the appointment was now cancelled and a very perfunctory apology was given. He added that they would contact me again with a new date, without any indication of when this would be done.

I know the NHS is under pressure but this is just simply rude and incompetent. I also know errors occur even in the best hospital. It's how the mistake is fixed that distinguishes an ordinary/bad hospital from a good or great one. Barnet is clearly not in the latter category.

Apart from a few phone calls, mainly instigated by my husband or myself and lots of 'leave it with me' statements from the various hospital representatives and PALS, that was it.

In response to a call from my husband I have been informed that I can have an appointment in December! For an appointment booked in July, arranged for October, messed up by the hospital, I should be grateful that I will only have to suffer another couple of months. No apology by the way.

I have just received confirmation of the new appointment .......for the same consultant who cancelled my last appointment two hours before it was due because he was not the appropriate specialist for my condition. You really couldn't make this up!

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terribear said on 22 July 2013

Hi, I was wondering who I can contact in regards to my mum, on Nov 15 last year she was told she had lung cancer in her right lung after being sent for a chest X-ray by her go because of a recurring cough/infection. She has had numerous biopsies, bronchoscopies and recently an ebus. They have all come back as inconclusive. She was told it was a massive mass and that after the third biopsy (as it had grown a bit) the only option left was to put her under and take a biopsy and test it while she was under and if it was cancer they would possibly have to take the lung away. The op was cancelled three times due to surgery running over and doc on holiday, then she got a chest infection and had to have three lots of antibiotics to clear it, and was alsodiagnosed with emphesyma in this time, so would not operate until her bloods were fully clear of infection, which took another month, then when they finally got her in, she was in all day and the surgeon came to talk to her and asked if she'd given up smoking (which she hadn't, cut by half and used an electronic one, because the original doc told her not to straight away as she would need them for the stress etc) so the surgeonsaid he couldn't do it, and would have to be clear for 4 weeks. Mum stopped instantly, the open got put off a couple more times and then they sent her for another scan to which now they've told her its spread across to her other lung and also her lymph nodes and she'd need chemo and radiotherapy and that's when they sent her for the ebus, and that's come back inconclusive. Its now July 22nd and she's had no treatment andshe's also having to take diazapam to sleep and an inhaler as she's struggling to breath, what can I do to follow up and get more info or push things forward? I'm also quite alarmed because she's under black pool Vic hospital, which is a black pool teaching hospital, second on the list as having the most deaths! Please help, otherwise I'm going to sit in until she gets results. Thanks.

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Rudbeckia said on 05 June 2013

I have been on Warfarin medicaton for 22 years and this last month I have been informed that I can no longer get my 5mg tablets on prescription. As I take 6mg and 7mg on alternate days, this means that I am taking six and seven tablets alternately and I find it difficult not to make an error in my medication.
Also I need a new prescription every fortnight to cover the new dosage, which involves an extra journey to the surgery.
This is an unacceptable situation and I find more errors can be made with this thoughtless decision to abolish the stronger dose tablets.
Retired Pharmacist (40yrs)

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Tagsy said on 04 October 2012

Very sadly, yesterday a 90 year old male was sent to Aand E at RLUBH Liverpool by his GP for investigation. His mobility is poor and so he uses a wheelchair altgough he can mobilise for short distance. He is a friend and respected member of his local and church community. He arrived at 11 a.m. and was still waiting 11 hours later for a bed in the MAU. When his daughter enquired, she is an ex health service employee, awarded an OBE in this years honours list, she was told that 'the board' showed he had only arrived at 8 p.m.!!! A mistake or a deliberate error to show targets were being met we don't know - this does sound excessive. He was eventually admitted to a ward.
Perhaps the Commissioner would like to commission an investigation into waiting times at RLBUH and see if figures are being correctly recorded and how often this happens tp older people. Millions of pounds spen on IT systems and we can't even get a white board to work correctly! Perhaps thgis should be looked into before it gets to the press.

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gilesa said on 01 November 2011

this man should have been referred to the local office of the HPA
http://www.hpa.org.uk/AboutTheHPA/ContactUs/HealthProtectionAgencyOffices/LocalHealthProtectionUnits

the correct health professional is the one to talk to"!
giles

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loveshelpingpeople said on 18 June 2011

Hi Bill,
I have found this info that you might like to read on suitablitity for vaccination (http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/bcg/pages/faqs.aspx)

Why do we no longer vaccinate teenagers with BCG at school? How can I get my child vaccinated?
TB is a difficult disease to catch because it requires prolonged exposure to an infected person. For example, you are very unlikely to catch it by sitting or standing next to someone who is infected. Also, rates of TB in the indigenous population have fallen to very low levels over the past 15 years.

The BCG vaccination programme was changed to reflect this, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. The BCG vaccine is now only given to people in at-risk groups (see Who should have it).

If your child does not come into one of the higher-risk groups, the current advice is not to give them the BCG vaccination. There are private clinics that parents can approach for a BCG vaccination, but the NHS does not keep a list of these clinics.

Also, check out this address for information on "who should have it"
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/BCG/Pages/When-it-is-needed.aspx

You don't say where you live but if you google
private bcg vaccination
it brings up a list of private practice that you might find useful.
Hope this helps,
Catherine

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loveshelpingpeople said on 18 June 2011

Hi Bill,
I have found this reference to who should you might be having trouble getting the info you need on the NHS web site

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/BCG/Pages/FAQs.aspx

which states:

Why do we no longer vaccinate teenagers with BCG at school? How can I get my child vaccinated?
TB is a difficult disease to catch because it requires prolonged exposure to an infected person. For example, you are very unlikely to catch it by sitting or standing next to someone who is infected. Also, rates of TB in the indigenous population have fallen to very low levels over the past 15 years.

The BCG vaccination programme was changed to reflect this, following advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. The BCG vaccine is now only given to people in at-risk groups (see Who should have it).

(Please check out this address which tells you who should be vaccintated)

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/BCG/Pages/When-it-is-needed.aspx

If your child does not come into one of the higher-risk groups, the current advice is not to give them the BCG vaccination. There are private clinics that parents can approach for a BCG vaccination, but the NHS does not keep a list of these clinics.

You don't say what area you are in but I have found one reference for you on the Internet for a private GP practice in Chelmsford that offer this service. Here is the http address.

http://www.privategpservices.co.uk/Services/vaccination/BCG/BCGVacc.html

Their tel no. is 01245 234134

Hope this helps,
Catherine

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william robert wright said on 03 June 2011

I normally regard the NHS as a great organisation. However, my latest experience has been disappointing. I recently phoned NHS Direct on behalf of my son and his wife. They recently had to have their seven month old twins vaccinated against tuberculosis, I believe it is called a BCG jab. They were told by NHS professionals that they also had to get their three year old daughter vaccinated with the BCG jab but she did not qualify to have it carried out on the NHS. Subsequently, I phoned NHS Direct for advice as to where we could pay privately for our granddaughter to have the vaccination. This led me to spend at least two hours phoning about twelve different numbers, all passed to me by different NHS personnel. Furthermore, I went on to the NHS ombudsman website that was also recommended to me but it turned out to be a law firm involved with litigation. I also tried phoning them but was spoken to by a solicitor who was unable to help. Having been told that our granddaughter should have the jab but not one being able to tell us where to get it has caused the family a great amount of worry. You are our last hope, so if our granddaughter does not qualify to have the vaccination on the NHS, please tell us where we can get it done privately.

Rergards

Bill

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Page last reviewed: 14/11/2013

Next review due: 14/11/2015

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