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Help with health costs

NHS voucher values for 2014

There are currently eight voucher values. The value of a voucher can range from £38.30 to £211.30, depending on the strength of the lenses you need. 

If, for clinical reasons, you need tints or prisms in your glasses, the value of the voucher will be increased to reflect this.

The voucher values are:

Voucher A: £38.30

Glasses with single vision lenses:

  •  with a spherical power of no more than 6 dioptres and a cylindrical power of no more than 2 dioptres.

Voucher B: £58.10

Glasses with single vision lenses:

  • with a spherical power more than 6 dioptres but no more than 10 dioptres, and a cylindrical power of no more than 6 dioptres
  • with a spherical power less than 10 dioptres and a cylindrical power more than 2 dioptres but no more than 6 dioptres

Voucher C: £85.10

Glasses with single vision lenses:

  •  with a spherical power of 10 or more dioptres but no more than 14 dioptres, and a cylindrical power of no more than 6 dioptres.

Voucher D: £192.20

Glasses with single vision lenses:

  • with a spherical power of more than 14 dioptres with any cylindrical power
  • with a cylindrical power of more than 6 dioptres with any spherical power

Voucher E: £66.10

Glasses with bifocal lenses (lenses with two distinct optical powers):

  •  with a spherical power of  no more than 6 dioptres, and a cylindrical power of no more than 2 dioptres.

Voucher F: £84.00

Glasses with bifocal lenses:

  • with a spherical power of more than 6 dioptres but no more than 10 dioptres, and a cylindrical power of no more than 6 dioptres
  • with a spherical power of less than 10 dioptres, and a cylindrical power of more than 2 dioptres but no more than 6 dioptres

Voucher G: £109.00

Glasses with bifocal lenses:

  •  with a spherical power of 10 or more dioptres but no more than 14 dioptres, and a cylindrical power of no more than 6 dioptres.

Voucher H: £211.30

Glasses with prism-controlled bifocal lenses of any power or with bifocal lenses:

  • with a spherical power of  more than 14 dioptres with any cylindrical power
  • with a cylindrical power of more than 6 dioptres with any spherical power

Voucher I (HES): £196.80

This category covers glasses prescribed by NHS trusts (hospitals) and that are not fall under any of the above categories (A-H).

Voucher J: £ 55.80

A voucher for contact lenses following a prescription issued by an NHS trust or NHS foundation trust.

Comments

The 5 comments posted are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

ScottishStu said on 05 November 2014

Hi, I am uncertain as to who decides the value of a voucher. I have untill now purchased my own gasses and have always insisted on transition lenses. I have found this to be of great benifit being a transplant patient with cronic anemia with which I am medicated with E.P.O. Being anemic with a baseline heamoglobin of 98 I find that my eyes are very sensativeto light and have failing eyesight in low levels.
I have also been medicated with Prograf and prednisolone with some scaring at the back of the eyes due to high blood pressure in the past. I am given regular eye tests and I am uncertan who to speek direct to, the doctor (Renal) the opthamologist or the optitions with regards to the value of my NHS voucher contrabution.

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EyeLyds said on 22 October 2014

To add to the previous comments-
Ann Hall - The voucher values for Varifocals are the same as those for Bifocals.
MandieMarriott - Without knowing more about you it is difficult to be precise. However, it sounds like you would be entitled to a free eye test every two years. The voucher towards the cost of new specs would then be issued after the test. It lasts the same time (in your case two years) as the prescription. Generally all you have to do is to visit an optician and book an eye test. There is no specific requirement to 'register' with an optician and you also have the right to take your prescription elsewhere to get your glasses. This can save you money but if you do have any problems with your glasses it is much harder to sort out as you may have to go both the optician that dispensed the galsses and the one that gave you the eye test.

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The mommy said on 19 September 2013

I had my eyes tested in June this year not knowing that i was entitled to an exemption certificate at the time i paid £250 out. then was sent an exemption certificate in August. the valid date was from April. I am a little annoyed that I had to borrow to pay for my glasses as I need them 24/7, when the certificate was valid for before. It took 4 months for this card to be sent out. Now I have to wait to see if i can claim my expenses back !! Why does it take this long ?? I understood this was to help low income people etc....

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MandieMarriott said on 29 May 2013

I am in receipt of a voucher for prescription glasses. I have had to move many times in the last few years. What happens when the two year span has passed and my glasses need renewing as my vision has deteriorated and is blurred? How do I request a voucher for some new glasses? Thank you.

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Ann Hall said on 20 October 2012

You do not mention the cost of varifocals. It may be that they are not included and if so should be shown.

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Page last reviewed: 09/09/2014

Next review due: 09/09/2016

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