Vaccinations

The NHS vaccination schedule

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the ages at which they should ideally be given.

If you're not sure whether you or your child have had all your routine vaccinations, ask your GP or practice nurse to find out for you. It may be possible to "catch up" later in life.

2 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine – this single jab contains vaccines to protect against five separate diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (known as Hib  a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children)  

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine

3 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, second dose

Meningitis C

Rotavirus vaccine, second dose

4 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, third dose

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, second dose

Between 12 and 13 months

Hib/Men C booster, given as a single jab containing meningitis C (second dose) and Hib (fourth dose)

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, given as a single jab

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, third dose

2 and 3 years

Flu vaccine (annual)

3 years and 4 months, or soon after

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, second dose

4-in-1 (DTaP/IPV) pre-school booster, given as a single jab containing vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and polio

Around 12-13 years

HPV vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only)  three jabs given within six months

Around 13-18 years

3-in-1 (Td/IPV) teenage booster, given as a single jab and contains vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus and polio

Around 13-15 years

Meningitis C booster

65 and over

Flu (every year)

Pneumococcal (PPV) vaccine

70 years

Shingles vaccine

Vaccines for special groups

There are some vaccines that aren't routinely available to everyone on the NHS, but that are available for people who fall into certain risk groups, such as pregnant women, people with long-term health conditions and healthcare workers.

Additional ones include hepatitis B vaccinationTB vaccination and chickenpox vaccination.

Travel vaccines

There are some travel vaccines that you should be able to have free on the NHS from your local surgery. These include the hepatitis A vaccine, the typhoid vaccine and the cholera vaccine. Other travel vaccines, such as yellow fever vaccination, are only available privately. Find out more from our section on travel vaccines.

 

Page last reviewed: 04/04/2014

Next review due: 04/04/2016

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Comments

The 54 comments posted are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

biddy123 said on 19 April 2014

i am particularly worried about my baby receiving immunisation jabs. I'm undecided as to whether its a good idea or not it seems to me to be a no win situation no matter what i decide.You get the jabs, they have their own risks. You get singles, they have risks (and costs). You get no jabs at all, that option has risks. It appears to me that there is no obvious safe option better than all the others. At the minute i don't think my child will be going for the jabs. I cant make my mind up. It is recommended every child is vaccinated and i can understand why this is. But i have also read a lot of information against these jabs which also make sense to me. Somebody is profiting from the promotion of these immunisations and this seems to me to be the bottom line. i would appreciate any advice on this subject that would help me make this hard decision.

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User865356 said on 16 April 2014

Hi
My baby has just had his first set of immunisations at eight weeks
Is there any problem if he does not have the next sets at twelve and sixteen weeks but they are delayed to twenty four and twenty eight weeks

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 10 April 2014

Dear phayward,

The decision to offer chickenpox vaccine to all children in the UK was reviewed by the JCVI (an independent committee who advises UK health departments on immunisation) in 2010. They concluded that universal chickenpox vaccination would not only not be cost effective but would also be likely to increase the risk of severe disease and complications in adults, both from chickenpox and shingles.

Whilst chickenpox during childhood is unpleasant, the vast majority of children get better quickly and easily. It's much worse to get it as an adult.

If a childhood chickenpox vaccination programme was introduced but not everyone chose to have the vaccine, some children would not catch chickenpox as children (as the infection would no longer circulate in areas where the majority of children had been vaccinated) leaving them at risk of contracting it as adults when they are more likely to develop severe infection, a complication or develop it in pregnancy when there is a risk of the infection harming the baby.

Also, there's a worry that widespread chickenpox vaccination in childhood could increase cases of shingles in adults. We know that adults who are naturally exposed to chickenpox (e.g. through contact with infected children) receive a natural boosting of their chickenpox antibodies which prevents the chickenpox virus from reactivating in their bodies and causing shingles. If you vaccinate children, you lose this natural boosting so more shingles will occur.

As a result, the JCVI have made a decision not to offer a universal chickenpox programme for children at this time.

Best wishes,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor



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NHSAUTISM said on 07 April 2014

This is a reply to Kathryn from NHS:

Dear Mrs. Kathryn I visited the link you provided.
1 There is no mention to the producer.
2 Telling half of a truth it is no better than a lie.There are a lot of ingredients missing on that link.
3 Please tell the people reading these comments what is MRC 5 cells.
I know they are found in the 5 in 1 vaccine (DtaP/IPV/Hib).

Please give us an up-date on MRC 5 cells.

Thank you in advance for your reply.

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phayward said on 03 April 2014

Can I ask why the Chicken Pox vaccine is not offered routinely in the UK. This is an entirely preventable condition, and I'm sure the benefits of being innoculated far outweigh any possible risks.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 03 April 2014

Dear shuba,
Routine vaccination schedules differ from country to country and are disease specific. Therefore while it may be possible for your baby to receive immunisations in India, these may differ to the vaccines he would have received in the UK. Discuss this with the doctor when you arrive in India and when you return to the UK so that any vaccines that have been given can be taken into account.
Best wishes,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 03 April 2014

Dear NHSAUTISM,
Read our article on vaccine ingredients http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vaccinations/Pages/vaccine-ingredients.aspx The article also tells you how to find out the ingredients of a specific vaccine. It's quite straightforward.
Kathryn, NHS Choices editor

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shuba said on 02 April 2014

Hi,
We had a baby on 4/3/14. we are planning to go to india, end of may. He will have his first dose of vaccines here. Could you please advice us if we could give the 2 and 3rd dose in india please
Thnaks in advance

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NHSAUTISM said on 01 April 2014

What are the vaccines ingredients?
The GP does not know. She said that they come from an NHS vaccine bank and we should google it.
Who is the producer and what are the ingredients?
I can easily get this info for a Paracetamol pill, why is it so difficult to find out the same info about vaccines?
If NHS has an website providing this info please tell us about it.

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SamMac said on 01 April 2014

I am expecting my first child and will give birth in the UK, however my husband is posted to Italy for his job with the UK government and we will return there soon after our child's birth, prior to the NHS vaccination programme having begun. We are trying to find out what to do for the best re vaccinations as the ones in Italy are given at different times.

Main differences are: 5-in-1 vaccine & Hib given at 2,3 and 4 months here, given at 3, 5-6 and 11-13 months in Italy
PCV vaccine is only PCV and not PCV13 in Italy and given at 3, 5-6 and 11-13 months in Italy, as opposed to 2, 4 and 12-13 months in UK
MCVC vaccine given in UK at 3 months & 12-13 months is given only once in Italy, at 13-15 months
MMR vaccine given at 12-13 months in UK is given at 13-15 months in Italy.
Our main concerns are with the delay in giving baby's first vaccinations - at 3 months instead of 2 months here. I was told when having the whooping cough vaccine during pregnancy that this would cover baby until its first jabs here, but I wonder whether it will cover it until it's 3 months old. I am also concerned that it appears to be a different vaccine for pneumococcal disease (PCV in Italy, PCV13 in UK).
We are concerned about the meningococcal vaccine being given only once in Italy, at 13-15 months instead of 3 months and boosted at 12-13 months, although my husband's employer has recommended we have the UK's meningitis C vaccine so I don't know if this is the one they mean.
Are you able to advise whether my whooping cough vaccine would cover our baby until it is 3 months old rather than 2? Are you also able to advise whether the boosters being given much later than in the UK would cover our baby to the same standard as the UK's programme? We are returning to the UK around baby being 18 months old so would also like reassurance that if we had the Italian jabs, that we could slot back in with the NHS programme on our return. Many thanks.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 28 March 2014

Dear Bensmum,
Yes, your son is able to receive his 12 week immunisations whilst visiting Scotland. Talk to your GP practice in London. The GP that your son is registered with remains responsible for his care and will be able to help you arrange for your baby to receive the necessary vaccines while you are in Scotland while sharing information between the two GP practices.
Thanks,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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NHSAUTISM said on 24 March 2014

My daughter is severely autistic. She was given a course of antibiotics soon after birth and then the 5 in 1 vaccines.
Nobody in my family or my wife's family has this condition apart from my daughter so genetics can not be blamed.
NHS does not have a clue what cause autism but they are sure that vaccines are safe. Really?
30 years ago, 1 in 10 000 children was autistic, today is 1 in 100.

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Bensmum said on 24 March 2014

My baby is 9 1/2 weeks old and has just had his 8 week injections (the doc was on hols so rescheduled appointment from last week). We are due his 12 week jabs in 4 weeks time but I am due to be in Scotland then for 3 weeks. I live in London. Is it possible to get his injections whilst I am in Scotland and if so how do I go about arranging this? Thanks very much for your help.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 20 March 2014

Dear 09emmam,

Although not routinely recommended, the 1st primary course of vaccines (8 weeks) can be offered from 6 weeks of age in the UK. Be aware though that vaccines and vaccination schedules may vary from country to country.
Therefore, your baby may not be able to receive the same vaccines offered as part of the UK schedule whilst in New Zealand and/or you may be required to purchase such vaccines at a cost.

It might be worth contacting your GP practice to discuss this further.

All best,
Kathryn, NHS Choices editor

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 12 March 2014

Dear Rubeymikey,
Children who have received chemotherapy may require re-vaccination. This is generally done on the advice of the paediatrician managing the child's care as they are best placed to do an assessment and decide on the need for and timing of vaccines. I suggest you liaise directly with the treating clinician to discuss the need for re-vaccination in this case.
Best wishes,
Kathryn, NHS Choices editor

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Rubymikey said on 05 March 2014

I work in child imms clinic and have a 10 year old young man coming in following completion of chemotherapy. I thought he would require complete schedule again but reading the Green book I'm a little unclear. If they do all need repeating how long do I leave between the primary imms and the boosters?

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Ted66 said on 04 March 2014

For some reason my previous post asking for data which supports the vaccination of children was removed. Why would the NHS do that?

Why is it that I can only find data like this: http://www.autyzm-szczepienia.eu/uploads/cnference%20autism%20materials.pdf

Where's the data to show that vaccinations provide a benefit? Pls. point me to this.

Thanks.

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envee said on 02 March 2014

Hello

Please help me. My daughter is getting her first round of immunisation (at 9 weeks), but we leave after three weeks for a month in India. Can we get the second round of immunisation with a three week gap? Or is it preferable to get the second round done by a doctor in India?

Thank you!

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09emmam said on 01 March 2014

Our baby is due May 23rd and we are going to New Zealand for 8 weeks in July. We wondered whether it would be possible to have the baby vaccinated slightly earlier than 8 weeks here and have the injections it needs at 3 months, out in NZ?

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 25 February 2014

Dear User524,
The NHS doesn't keep individually named records of any kind for data protection reasons, so the main source for your vaccination records is your GP. A note of the vaccinations you received at school should have been passed to your GP to add to your records. You could try for a more complete record of your vaccinations at your local Child Health Computer (your GP surgery might be able to help with this) or your former school’s School Nursing team.
Thanks,
Kathryn, NHS Choices editor

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User524 said on 21 February 2014

I would like to have my record of the vaccination I had since I was born. I requested GP and they gave me the record of the vaccination that I had at GP but not the ones I had at my secondary school, e.g. HPV, DTP booster, Rubella, DTP booster etc. Where can I ask the record of all the vaccination including the jabs that I had at the school? Is there anywhere whom I can ask except GP?

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 21 February 2014

Dear Clairol100

Your daughter should have a single dose of PCV13.

Thanks,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Clairol100 said on 20 February 2014

My daughter has missed her 3rd vaccination for PCV. She is now 19 months old. What do I need to do please? (I was not negligent my daughter was adopted).

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 11 February 2014

Dear Florence4319,
In general, if you have a minor illness like a cold, there’s no reason to delay vaccination. But if you also have a fever (high temperature), then it's best to delay having the vaccination until you're better to avoid the possibility of the vaccine making the fever worse.
Hope that helps,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Florence4319 said on 10 February 2014

I'm in year 10 and I'm supposed to have some injections tomorrow and I have a cold can I still have them tomorrow?

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mbkeskin said on 08 February 2014

Hi..
Thank you for precious information.
I want to ask a question.
My baby was born in Turkey on 24 August 2013.
She will be 6 months on 24 february.
According to our home country schedule she should be vaccined the following vaccinations on 24th of february:
1- Hepatit B (3rd dose)
2- 5 in 1 (DaBT IPA Hib) (3rd dose)
3- PCV (3rd dose)
4- Rotateq (3rd dose)
5- OPV Oral Polio vaccine (1st dose)
I wanted to learn if we can have our baby vaccined those from our GP on the sixth month of our baby?
Thank you. Best regards.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 07 February 2014

Dear Rooooo,

You might be interested in this vaccination timeline showing when individual vaccines were introduced:
http://bit.ly/LWc8zi

Best wishes,
Kathryn, NHS Choices editor

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Rooooo said on 19 January 2014

It would helpful to add next to each vaccine the year they were introduced, as I know the are some on there that are new since my childhood, yet the list doesn't include some vaccinations that i know my age group had (for example BCG/Tuberculosis)

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 16 January 2014

Dear BharatGidde,

Children that have been born in another country but currently live in the UK and are likely to remain here for the foreseeable future, are encouraged to follow the UK immunisation schedule. This ensures they're protected against a range of diseases that are currently circulating in this country. So, your daughter should have her MMR from 12 months as is routine here.

Hope that helps,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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BharatGidde said on 10 January 2014

Hi
My Daughter was born on 26-Apr-2013 in India. And below vaccination has been provided to her as per the schedule of vaccination in India. BCG, OPV(3), HBV(3), HIB(3), DPT(3), OPV(3), RotaVirus (2) and Pnemococcal (3). number in bracket is number of doses. Now as per that schedule after her 9 months completion Measles, OPV (4th) & VIT-A dose should be given. But as per UK vaccination schedule, Measles dose will be given after 12 months.
Please suggest will it be fine to give the doses now as per UK schedule. Or should India schedule be followed?
My local GP told me that they will come back to me on this. Thanks for your help in advance.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 23 December 2013

Dear Becky_1979,

Your little girl is fine. She had her first and second set of jabs on time. She is due a third set on the 16th January or thereabouts - maybe these are the vaccinations the letter referred to.

Best wishes,

Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Becky_1979 said on 20 December 2013

My little girl was born on the 22nd Sept. she had her first set of jabs on 20th November (8weeks+3) and the second set yesterday 19th December (12weeks+5). I've just received a letter saying that I should book her second set of jabs after 30th December!
I am now worried that she's had her jabs too early? Is she going to be ok??? At the GP they only said that the second set of jabs had to be 4 weeks after the first. Please help.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 11 December 2013

Dear AKSB,

Your daughter can have the vaccinations as soon as you're back in the UK. There shouldn't be any problems, other than a little bit later than ideal.

All the best,

Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 11 December 2013

Dear Rosy1811,

Don't worry - this is definitely not a problem. Your child has in effect been vaccinated with a short interval between the first and second dose and then the third dose will have acted as a normal booster. If an additional dose of vaccines has been given, this will not be a problem either and will simply be another further booster. No harm will have been done and your son will be very well protected!

Best wishes,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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AKSB said on 10 December 2013

Hello I need your help.
My daughter was born 3rd of October 2013 and I had to travel outside UK 3 weeks after.
I'm trying to give her the vaccination on time, but some vaccines are not available where I am now.
for example the Haemophilus influenzae b [Hib] and Pneumococcal conjugate.

I'll be back to the UK end of February 2014, she will be 5 months by that time.
Can she take the missed Vaccination? is there any side effects if she didn't take them on the scheduled time?

Please advise.

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Rosy1811 said on 28 November 2013

Hi, please help.
I have just been informed by my local GP surgery that my 16week old son was given his second set of immunisations 2 weeks early. The nurse tells me that is is completely her fault and that she would be devastated if it was her child! What does this mean? She tells me that he now has to have four sets of vaccinations instead of the normal requirement. What are the implications of him having the additional dose and what happens if he doesn't? Has this happened before? I'm worried and feel as though I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place, what should I do and is it safe? Please help.

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misskb said on 08 October 2013

Hi I am trying to get some travel vaccines for my family (we need hep A) but our GP has closed their travel clinic, our local NHS walk in centre tells me that they are not doing vaccines any longer for walk in patients, and that I should go to Boots or Superdrug - who in turn want to charge us £20 consultation fee and then £49 per dose for the vaccine £69 per person. How can we get a vaccine which is listed free on the NHS on this page when our local NHS service is unwilling to help?
Really appreciate a response.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 02 October 2013

Dear christo30,

If he had his 12/13 month MMR then he doesn't need another until age 3. If he missed his 12/13 month MMR, he should have it ASAP.

Thanks,
Kathryn, NHS Choices editor

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christo30 said on 01 October 2013

Hello there,
My child is 16 months and he is up to date with the immunisations. We used to live in west london and the practice nurse told me the next vaccination is due only at 3 1/2 yrs age but now i have moved to Southwark (SE1) and the nurse at the new GP surgery says the MMR 2nd dose needs to be done ASAP. Could you please tell me whether it is right to have the MMR 2nd dose when he is 16 months old? If so waht is the reason behind it? Please let me know. Awaiting for your earliest reply.Thanks.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 18 September 2013

Dear peternogma,
If he has his 4-month vaccines before you travel, that's your son up to date until he's a year old. Try to have all the UK vaccines before you go as the ones in Africa may not include all the ones that are routine in the UK.
Best wishes,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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peternogma said on 16 September 2013

Hi, our son was born 17th July, 2013 and had his first vaccine on 13th September, 2013. We plan to relocate to one of the West African countries as I have a job there. I am African and my wife is European, hence, our son is mixed.
We have booked our flight for 30th November, 3013 by which time we presume that he would have had his 4 month vaccines.
What other vaccines do we need for him? Just in case by then we don't have the 4 month vaccines, can we still travel?
Thank you and look forward to your response.

Peter

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JamesDunstable said on 25 August 2013

My son is 16 weeks on Thursday (29th August). He has had his 8 & 12 week vaccines. However for these we had appointment letters in good time.

He is due his 16 week vaccine on 3rd September but no appointment letter has arrived, as stated we would have had our 8 & 12 week appointment letter by now.

Is it normal for letters not to arrive around the same timescales as the other appointments?

Thanks

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princenb said on 15 August 2013

Hi all,
I am new on here. I have a 13 months son who hasnt had his 12 - 13 months injection. I phoned the GP they insisted I have to wait for a letter from health service which hasnt arrived yet?
Any advice

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LauraYu said on 14 August 2013

I have a similar query to Antonf. My daughter was born on 27 May and would be due her 16 week Vaccinations while we be in China. We are able to get the five in one there but not prevenar13 ( they are using prevenar still).

Would it be an issue if my daughter has the injection before we leave on 28 August? From the manufacturers website it seems that dowse can be between four and eight weeks apart, however my nurse was unsure about this.

Thanks,


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antonf said on 12 August 2013

My daughter was born on 16 June 2013. She has just got her vaccines at 8 weeks on 12 August. The next vaccination should be at 12 weeks on 9 September.
The problem is we have booked a month-long holiday in Slovakia starting 3 September.
Could You give me advise on what the best/acceptable solution we could have.
Can re-book the holiday for 9 September if it's inevitable.
We would just loose money. :-)
Cheers
Anton

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 05 August 2013

Dear Dorita,

Yes he can. It's known in the UK as the 4-in-1 pre-school booster and is usually given here at age 3. Get the vaccine from a GP surgery and your son can be assessed and also receive any other vaccines he may have missed such as Men C and MMR.

Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Dorita said on 02 August 2013

Currently we are living in Hungary. My child doesn't have Infanrix vaccination at the age 6, because he had fever and now we are going to UK on Monday. Can he get this vaccination in UK before starting school there?

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FM28 said on 23 July 2013

Typhoid vaccination:
We need the above vaccine before we travel to Bangladesh. Been to GP but told vaccine not available. Spoke to a Pharmacy who also said unable to get vaccine.
Is NHS aware of it?
What should we do, as without typhoid vaccination and travel risks to be infected and on return the NHS hospitals will have to treat. Large numbers travel to Far east and Indian Subcontinent.
Where are the NHS travel clinics?
Where does the private clinics obtain there vaccines?
Would appreciate early response.
FM28

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 19 July 2013

Mary2013:
There is no problem your son starting the UK schedule after the age of one, although a slightly different range of vaccines is needed. Read more here:
http://www.hpa.org.uk/webc/HPAwebFile/HPAweb_C/1194947406156
Try to start the vaccinations as soon as you can after arriving in the UK.

Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Mary2013 said on 18 July 2013

My son now is almost 11 months old, he was born in Ukraine. He got his TB vaccination after few days he was born. And haven't got any other vaccination because I was not sure as for appropriate vaccine storage in our clinic. In 2-3 months we are moving to he UK. I would like to find out is it going to be a problem to start my son's vaccination as it scheduled here after he will be 1 year old. Thank you in advance.

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 16 July 2013

Dear UsmanKhalid,

The two week delay isn't a problem.

Best wishes,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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UsmanKhalid said on 15 July 2013

My twins got their first vaccination when they were two months old (approx) in the UK. Then we had to relocate overseas where I have been following the NHS vaccination schedule.

My question is about the 2nd dose of Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine which should have been administered at month 4. It was given to my twins when they were 4months and 2 weeks old. Is this delay of 2 weeks going to be a problem or not?

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Kathryn at NHS Choices said on 20 June 2013

Dear Ng7

It's safe for them to have more than two doses of MMR vaccine. The immunity built up by the first two vaccinations will see off the weakened viruses contained in any subsequent vaccinations, or indeed, infections.

Having said that, if your kids have had all six individual vaccinations there's no need for any MMR vaccinations (provided you're confident the clinic stored and handled the single vaccines properly).

All the best,
Kathryn Bingham, NHS Choices editor

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Ng7 said on 19 June 2013

My children had single vaccines rather than MMRs. I have seen the comments suggesting that they should have the MMRs now, but that would mean 4 does each of measles, mumps and rubella. Please could you advise whether this safe and whether there would any side effects of having so much of any of these 3 vaccines?
Is it possible to have just a measles vaccine if it is really required?
Thank you.

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Flu vaccine for children

The children's nasal spray flu vaccine is for two and three year olds plus children with long-term health problems

Travel vaccinations

Learn about the vaccinations available for travellers, and the diseases they protect against

Protect your child against measles

Find out more about the MMR jab

Protect your daughter against cervical cancer

Find out more about the HPV vaccination

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