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Pregnancy and baby

Baby teething symptoms

When it comes to teething, all babies are different. But your baby will probably get their first tooth some time during their first year.

Keep reading to find out how to spot when your baby is teething and what order your baby's teeth are likely to appear in.

When do babies start teething?

Some babies are born with their first teeth. Others start teething before they are 4 months old, and some after 12 months. But most babies start teething at around 6 months. 

Teething symptoms

Baby teeth sometimes emerge with no pain or discomfort at all. At other times, you may notice that:

  • your baby's gum is sore and red where the tooth is coming through
  • one cheek is flushed
  • your baby is dribbling more than usual
  • they are gnawing and chewing on things a lot
  • they are more fretful than usual 

Read our tips on how to help your teething baby.

Some people think that teething causes other symptoms, such as diarrhoea and fever, but there's no evidence to support this.

You know your baby best. If they have any symptoms that are causing you concern, then seek medical advice. You can call NHS 111 or contact your GP.

Read more about spotting the signs of serious illness.

What order do baby teeth appear in?

Here's a rough guide to how babies' teeth usually emerge:

  • bottom incisors (bottom front teeth) – these are usually the first to come through, usually at around 5 to 7 months
  • top incisors (top front teeth) – these tend to come through at about 6 to 8 months
  • top lateral incisors (either side of the top front teeth) – these come through at around 9 to 11 months
  • bottom lateral incisors (either side of the bottom front teeth) – these come through at around 10 to 12 months
  • first molars (back teeth) – these come through at around 12 to 16 months
  • canines (towards the back of the mouth) – these come through at around 16 to 20 months
  • second molars – these come through at around 20 to 30 months

Most children will have all of their milk teeth by the time they are two and a half years old. 

Is my baby teething?

Media last reviewed: 22/01/2015

Next review due: 22/01/2017

Page last reviewed: 10/02/2016

Next review due: 10/02/2018

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Teething tips

How to help your baby through teething, including advice on gels, teething rings, painkillers and avoiding teething rash