Underactive thyroid (Hypothyroidism) - Treatment 

Treating underactive thyroid 

Levothyroxine should be taken with water on an empty stomach

Underactive thyroid and pregnancy

Tell your GP if you're pregnant or are planning a pregnancy and you have an underactive thyroid. They will refer you to a specialist because there is a risk to your baby if your underactive thyroid is not treated properly during pregnancy.

See complications of an underactive thyroid for more information.

Find out how your local NHS manages hypothyroidism care

An underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) is usually treated by taking daily hormone-replacement tablets called levothyroxine.

Levothyroxine replaces the thyroxine hormone which your thyroid does not make enough of.

You will initially have regular blood tests until the correct dose of levothyroxine is reached. This can take a little while to get right.

You may start on a low dose of levothyroxine, which may be increased gradually depending on how your body responds. Some people start to feel better soon after beginning treatment, while others don't notice an improvement in their symptoms for several months

Once you are taking the correct dose, you will usually have a blood test once a year to monitor your hormone levels.

If blood tests suggest you may have an underactive thyroid, but you do not have any symptoms or they are very mild, you may not need any treatment. In these cases, your GP will usually monitor your hormone levels every few months and prescribe levothyroxine if you develop symptoms.

Taking levothyroxine

If you are prescribed levothyroxine, you should take one tablet at the same time every day.

The effectiveness of the tablets can be altered by other medications, supplements or foods, so they should be swallowed with water on an empty stomach and you should avoid eating for 30 minutes afterwards. Taking the tablets in the morning is usually recommended, although some people prefer to take them at night.

If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember if this is within a few hours of your usual time. If you do not remember until later than this, skip the dose and take the next dose at the usual time unless advised otherwise by your doctor. Do not take two doses together to make up for a missed dose.

An underactive thyroid is a lifelong condition, so you will usually need to take levothyroxine for the rest of your life.

If you are prescribed levothyroxine because you have an underactive thyroid, you are entitled to a medical exemption certificate. This means you do not have to pay for any of your prescriptions. See help with prescription costs for more information about this.

Side effects

Levothyroxine does not usually have any side effects as the tablets simply replace a missing hormone.

Side effects usually only occur if you are taking too much levothyroxine. This can cause problems including chest pain, sweating, headaches, diarrhoea and vomiting.

You should tell your doctor if you develop new symptoms while taking levothyroxine. You should also let them know if your symptoms get worse or do not improve.

Triiodothyronine (T3) treatment

In the UK, treatment for underactive thyroid involving a combination of levothyroxine and a hormone called triiodothyronine (T3) is not usually recommended because studies have found no evidence that this is more effective.

There are also concerns that taking both these hormone-replacement medications may increase your risk of serious side effects such as an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and weak bones (osteoporosis).

Page last reviewed: 02/07/2013

Next review due: 02/07/2015

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Comments

The 50 comments posted are personal views. Any information they give has not been checked and may not be accurate.

Dings said on 17 July 2014

It's really comforting to read these comments which resonate vety strongly with me. I have had all the major symptoms for years, but because my bloods fall within the ridiculously broad parameters, I just have to take levo every day and my GP refuses to acknowledge that the tests may not reveal everything and he doesn't listen to the symptoms. I guess I need to find an endocrinologist and go private. Judging by this forum, GPs don't know what they are dealing with and just prescribe within the very broad spectrum and leave us hypos to suffer the symptoms on our own.

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ceres108 said on 01 November 2013

I think it's very interesting to see the amount of people who comment that they are taking levothyroxine and are still suffering, I've been diagnosed since I was 13 (11 years) and have also not really felt great even when my levels have read as "ok"

What they don't do when they diagnose you is give you any information about living with the disorder. After lots of research on my part I've discovered things like diet control and exercising as a way of helping (and will help with B12 and Vit D deficiency) and times of day Levo is taken. I don't think people should have to sift through all the rubbish that you can find on the internet on Hypothyroidism to get this useful and life changing information. Diabetics wouldn't be sent home without a clear guide about lifestyle changes, why shouldn't we?

I know the NHS is stretched but with the amount of sufferers there are you'd think a simple information leaflet would be a useful way of helping all these people and stop misinformed comments like "Hypothyroidism is making me dyslexic" and clear up the issues regarding T3 treatments.

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elsfield43 said on 25 September 2013

Whenever I read about hypothyroidism, the professionals always say that thyroxine is the treatment. They never mention the stones that are put on, and the thyroxine does nothing to help that. It may not be a serious disease, but you can say good buy to your old life. Your appetite doesn't increase though, in fact food is a bore, but those 6 stones won't budge. And you are never asked how you feel. Recently, I have had 2 months of extra energy and feeling quite energetic. Then the blood test was due and I am told my thyroid is too high, and to take a drop in thyroxine. It doesn.t matter how I feel, I must stay within the levels?

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Jade DanielleThomas said on 11 September 2013

I am 22 years old and have and under active thyroid, I have been on Levothyroxine for around a year, I am also a type one diabetic which I believe is the cause.
Since being put on Levothyroxine I haven't been back to the doctors about it but I am becoming increasing unwell.

I almost had forgot about the thyroid problem but over the last few month I am finding it hard to do normal things, each day I am getting more and more tired and I didn't really understand why. Its good to read what other people feel, My boyfriend doesn't understand and says I'm depressed when I just think I'm extremely tried all the time and my body aches. Should I be going back to the doctors and having another test? Is the anything I can do at home or take that may make me feel a little better? Or is it more medication ?

I am also at a different doctors as I as i have recently moved and he doesn't know my medical history so its hard to get them to understand the list of problems I have. I really do feel alone at the moment and it feels like every day I'm getting worse. My mouth is full of ulcers, has anyone else experienced this ? ( it could be my diabetes i guess)

I just hope i can get some answers soon.

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Saffron2 said on 13 August 2013

Add your comment in 2000 characters or less
I am having to pay privately just to convince my GP that I am hypo and in order to receive Levo. I have over 20 symptoms and have close family history. I have had some improvement but still cannot lead a normal life. I am a single parent of a 7yr old and work full time. My GP has refused my T3 and said it's not available on the NHS though I know it is. He had t even heard if T3. The specialty as me to discuss with him and now because it's expensive he is refusing me. My B12 is low and D3 mild deficiency. I am so tired, confused, joint pain, pain in Achilles' tendons, yeast infections and now tinnitus for 2 months just to name a few. Why is only Levo readily available when so many can't easily absorb it? I will have to go private again and pay £2.50 a tablet for T3, over £900 a year or look for Armour on the Internet. People are collapsing and dying because they are not getting treatment. GP's only look at blood test results only TSH and only know about tiredness and weight gain. Well I've gain 20kg in 18 months and he's still in denial. I am do bad that I have become dyslexic and can't do maths. This is clearly a drugs war and a money making business. T3 and Armour should be readily available is Levo is not working! How many have to die, how many petitions do we need to make changes. I'm writing to the Prime Minister. Who's with me?

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Saffron2 said on 05 August 2013

Hi,
I've been on Levothyroxine for about 6 months. I have worked my way up from 50-200mg. Only a few of my symptoms have improved. My B12, iron and Vit D are low or show mild deficiency. My thyroid tests showed low end of normal and my mother has same condition. I have to go privately to convince my GP of my condition. Unfortunately my GP only looks at blood test results and not my symptoms. I have appointment this week to discuss T3. My B12 was low at 276. 3 weeks later I had blurred vision, ringing in ears and constant headaches. My B12 injections have be resumed again but I still have the constant ringing. It's been about 7 weeks now. I am still tired and my spelling and maths has deteriorated. My memory is poor and I can struggle to digest an assignment brief or use a computer. My hair falls out, I have heavy menses, stiffness all over body. Pains especially in the knees and giving way up the stairs. Painful Achilles' tendons. Recurrent or persistent thrush. Dry skin patches. Dry feet with cracked heels, flaking nails and swollen fingers. Gained 20kg in 2 yrs. loss of balance and constipation. Not to mention confusion . But apparently I'm just depressed. My memory has been really bad for a year. It would not surprise me if I have permanent nerve damage.

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Loz88 said on 12 February 2013

Vicky, I was under the impression that 7.7 was out of range too.

I have a different problem. My thyroid seems to be under control, I still get tired occasionally but that is more to do with shift work. However, my biggest problem is that since I have been on the medication my weight has plummetted (I was skinny to begin with) and I have completely lost the very little cleavage I had. My husband, seeing how frustrated I was, has bought me some breast improvement pills to try as I was too embarrassed to talk to the doctor. The bottle says though that if you are taking any other medication that you should consult docs first.

So I guess my question is, does any one know if they will interfere with my thyroxine (and my microgynon for that matter!) ?

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vickyh221 said on 04 February 2013

Hello can anyone help??? i am at a loss as to what to do and need as much advise and help........i had bloods done about two weeks ago and my TSH level was 7.7 i believed this was out of the normal range is it not???
but the doctors thought it was normal so i wouldn't be able to get the correct medication to get this thyroid under control?? am i being over dramatic or have i got my facts completely crossed please set me straight as i am feeling so low from being mucked about like this... please!!!!

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sixdice said on 21 December 2012

Just to say that it is not true that the NHS cannot prescribe T3,they can but are often unwilling to do so through ignorance.If you are not getting better on T4 Levothyroxine then push for T3,you have nothing to lose.Lots of info on Thyroid Patient Advocacy site.This country's NHS trivializes this condition and often does not treat it correctly with combination T3/T4 therapy.

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Peggy16 said on 24 October 2012

Hello. Any advice on managing bad dreams with an underactive thyroid? I’ve been on Levothyroxine for 9 months, and Vit D supplements as have oesteopenia. I’m trying hard to lose weight, over a third of the way towards losing 3 stone, which is/has been really tough. But it’s the bad dreams. Is it the meds? I’m in my 50s and lived with lifelong insomnia. I’m sleeping much longer now since being on the meds, but the bad dreams are so vivid and so disturbing. I’ve since learnt to leave a 4 hour gap or more between taking meds and Vit D. Any advice please in managing or reducing the bad dreams?

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shelly31 said on 16 October 2012

Im just reading everyone's comments and can relate to so many of you . i was diagnosed with underactive thyroid in february after seeing my doctor as i was gaining weight despite being in my 8th year at goal at weight watchers, my hair was falling out and my periods became irregular and was prescribed 50mg of thyroxine. i managed to lose half a stone slowly but in the past few months ive put it back on and my periods have become irregular again . i went back to my gp who has agreed to do blood tests again but he said if they come back ok he doesnt know what else he can do . i get the impression because im not classed as overweight(9 stone 11) he doesnt see it as a major problem but it is really getting me down .

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eve20 said on 17 September 2012

In result of GP neglecting my thyroid now I am suffering a huge increase in weight and swelling of my thyroid gland.

About a year and half ago, my hair started falling out, nails breaking, became sensitive to the cold, would loose temper quickly and notice weight gaining I researched online what could be and one of them I found out under active Thyroid. I talked to my mum and she said that it is very common in her side of family my grandma had it, my mom and 2 of her sisters. So I went to GP to see if that was the case, he done blood test and said that its little high but not worry about. After gaining 2 dress sizes ( from size 10 to size12) I went back asking for another test, he done it and it as worse, yet again its still little high but its OK. When I reached size 16 I was in tears, nothing would help stop the growth of weight I would work out 4 times a week with sweat pouring from me, would watch what I eat forgot the taste of sweets and chocolate, and yet when I go back for another test he said that I should not come as often and maybe I would not gain weight if I would eat less. I said what do you mean he goes well do not eat cakes sweets chocolates, I almost burst out in anger, I told him that I haven't had treat in months, I exercise and nothing helps he said, well try harder. That was it for me July 31st I booked tickets to my home country Lithuania to see one of the best specialist there. After he examined my blood and scanned my thyroid he was in shock, and said only a blind person can not see how bad it got for me, my glands are swollen antibodies TSH are wayyy too high, he prescribed me 100 L-thyroxine and now I am going back in October to see him to check if the dose is helping but so far I lost the 2kg so I am extremely happy and I know its going to take a while to go back to my previous size, but I have faith... However hen I think about it, it makes me mad because if my GP would of bothered I would not have gained so much.

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FREE_SPIRIT_83 said on 24 July 2012

Continued...

I also wanted to find out with anyone has Secondary Hypothyroidism, as this is caused by the Puitary Gland and not the thyroid itself. It is for this reason that my TSH and T4 levels are too low, with is causing me all this weakness.

I go back to uni in Sept and i am absolutely in peices, just dont know how I can cope with all this while studying.

Can someone please advice me how long it took them to feel normal again if there levels were as low as mine on Leothyroxine?

Many thanks :)
xx

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FREE_SPIRIT_83 said on 24 July 2012

Hello all,

I have been reading pretty much all the comments and i can so relate to the anger and frustration that we are all sharing. This is the only reason why i am studying medicine so i can become an endecronologist to help suffers like us!

I have been diagnosed with hypo in 2010 whilst travelling abroad. I mainly complained about weight gain and fatiguness to my GP here in the UK, but all i was told was to eat less and exercise more. I used to train 4-5 times a week and as a qualified personal trainer, I knew that despite all my physical efforts, I would still not lose a pound.

I came back to the UK and was perscribed Leothyroxine for a year, startig from 50mcg to 150mcg. This medication made no change to my moods, as i suffered from severe depression, my cold body temperature, constant weight gain, mental slughiness, (brain fog), constipation, hair loss, excessive sleeping, muscle cramps and joint aches. Over period of time I also began having earing difficulties as well as vision problems -(currently still having the same symptoms).

Due to few friends being Dr's I was told to try out T3 (Liothyroxine- Cytomel) for a while and I managed to get some off. I had nothing to lose, as the quality of my life suffered greatly at age 27. After taking T3 on a pyramid cycle, I began to lose weight and all the symptoms of above vanished as if i had never had hypothyroidism.

However, once I ran out of the medication, I retreated back to my old self, depressed and tired. GP's are not allowed to perscribe T3 in the UK and an endeo is very reluctant to do anything let alone perscribe T3.

I was recently admited to A&E middle of the night with severe shortness of breath, chest pains and dizziness.

Got my new thyroid levels and my TSH is 0.20 and FT4 is 7.0

I am now back on Leothyroxine, 50mcg with the advice from my GP to increase the dose to 100mcg after 3 weeks and repeat my blood test again.

I wish we all get better soon. xx love

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claggy said on 07 July 2012

just to add to my previous post.

The most important number to pay attention to is your FT3, as this is the active hormone. Whats important is to find the level of FT3 that makes you feel well, as were all different this could be anywhere within the so called normal range. Occasionally this may require your TSH to be right at the low end of normal and occasionally even slightly suppressed. You need to find a GP that understands this and is prepared to work with you.

I am not a doctor, just a person who has lived with this condition for about 40 years, and learned that far from being a simple disease it can be quite complicated and require a great deal of patience, both from the doctor and the patient.

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claggy said on 07 July 2012

the main problem with treatment of hypothyroidism are the very wide ranges for blood test results. For example in my region,

tsh 0.3-5.5
ft4 12-20
ft3 3.5-5.5

Using myself as an example, taking 100mcg of levo my bloods were usually at the bottom end of normal as follows.

tsh 3.5
ft4 14.0
ft3 3.7

as a result I still suffered many hypo symptoms, I eventually persuaded my GP to allow me to go to the high end of normal and increased my levo to 150mcg,
My bloods on this dose are usually as follows

tsh 0.2
ft4 20
ft3 5.5

I have been on this dose now for about 3 years no side effects and feel really well. Yet for the previous 15 years taking 100 mcg I still suffered many hypo symtoms.

You must understand that once on treatment TSH becomes less important and what a good GP should treat is your free's (ft4 and ft3) and be prepared to push these up until the patient becomes symptom free.

One final note, with this illness it is very important that the sufferer educates him or her self with every aspect of the condition. Sadly many GP's are very lacking when it comes to the thyroid gland and its related conditions.

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Lindamil1957 said on 12 June 2012

I was diagnosed with a thyroid problem last year after I went to the doctor to see if I could have HRT, they decided to do a blood test and I was called back to surgery the same day as my TSH was 48 and the doctor said it should be 4 and was at risk of going into a coma, Until March I was on a 100 mg, but despite still complaining of aches and pains, thin hair, lack of libido, constant tiredness and weight gain the doctor decide to reduce my dosage to 75mg,when I queried this with them they said that this was the correct dosage for me, I said I am still putting on wieght although I am trying to eat healthily, when asked what I had had for breakfast that day i told them weetabix and banana, he said that perhaps I should just have the banana on its own or the weetabix on their own and i was probably eating too much, and probably nibble while I cooked meals, I got very upset to which they decided I should have Citalopram to calm my anxiety and vist a healthy mind clinic, am I loosing my mind?? just feel very let down and am now looking to find a supplement on the health shops that may help me, would be grateful for any advise please, oooh by the way I also get uncomfortably hot but thought that may be cos I am half way through the menopause. look forward to hearing from anyone.

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Lizzy_P said on 01 May 2012

I have been to my doctor once before about a suspected under-active thyroid and my test came back as being within the 'normal' range. I am not, however, convinced that it is normal for me. What is normal for one person, is not normal for another. I suffer from dry skin, I always feel cold (we have the fire on at the moment, it's 26C and I am in my hoody and wrapped in a quilt (this is typical)), I have had depression a couple of times and have been diagnosed with S.A.D., I often feel tired and I have gained a lot of weight over the years. The weight gain I think is the most obvious symptom. As soon as I hit 13, I piled on the weight even though I was a competitive swimmer, training 5 times a week with galas at weekends. I also rowed for Wales, did Judo and school sports. I am also training for Race for Life whilst following Slimming World and I haven't lost a single lb. I find that doctors are dismissive 99% of the time because I am fat. The only time that I can lose weight is when I drop to 500 calories. When I told my doctor this, he just told me to keep cutting out food groups! Another told me that my body is obviously very adept at working on very few calories and just shrugged his shoulders! Has anyone else had to fight to get their doctor to listen to them? Any advice on how to get them to listen?

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orbie said on 24 March 2012

I've recently been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, unfortunately I've a poor sickness record and less than two months after discovering the cause have just been sacked.
Problem is employer quoted only the basic symptoms like tiredness, cold, brittle nails etc and would not take into account other symptoms.
Of course I need the extra stress like a hole in the head!
Anyone else had trouble with employers?

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sheba12 said on 18 January 2012

hi all sufferers,Im so glad I came on this site,reading all your comments has made me feel like im not alone,im nearly 46 and have had hypothyroidism since I was born&like u all im disgusted &dissapointed in our health service fobbin us off.im on 250mcg at the moment and sleep up to 16 hours a day,no energy ,unless I drink my usual vodka&energy drink .a usual treat on wkends.otherwise id go mad. so when I go 4 my next lood test im going to ask for a other tests as well,il let u know how I get on in 2weeks.thanks 2 all of u .i now know more about it , x

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pam1956 said on 22 November 2011

my body shut down about 15 years ago now, the doctors finally tested my thyroid and decided i must have had it since i was young. To cut a long story short i now take 300mg of thyroxine and i still have all of the symptoms you good people have. I am so fed up, i now have heart desease and my kidneys are playing up putting me in hospital and still nothing more is being done. Just this week i got blood results back saying everything is fine and i was told at my age things like really bad hair loss my nails just peeling away and fatigue should be expected even without thyroid desease, im 55 for goodness sake !! I asked for a t3 test, no joy they cant do it . Still they wont refer me back to hospital in the hope that someone can actually help me. I feel frustrated and ignored with nowhere to turn. It is upseting to find there are so many people in the same situation.I suppose we just have to get on with it, good luck everyone and best wishes.

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shipshape said on 10 August 2011

hello girls/guys/ i have read your comments and feel the same as you do. fobbed off and forgotten,problem is the endocrine is multi functional- it affects, gut/gastro/heart/ muscles/nerves/adrenal glands/ ears/ everything.. i dont know what is going on with the endos training these days.. when the 17century dr thomas addisons knew what addisons disease was--- i rest my case! if we dont fit into their text book, then we are either imaging it, or are hypocondriacs. i know i am one ---according to the medical people, i have so many probs.polycystic ovaries. stage 3 kidney, damagd left ear,muscle twitching and nerve twitching , trembling/tremors and the last year has been an ordeal, i have never been so dreadfully ill for so long and its still going on.. i have awful sensations in my body at night when i drop off to sleep i am forced awake by adrenaline rushes at least i think it could be, it pounds into my head and it feels like pressure building and building until my head could burst, its happened each night for a year an di cant take anymore, no-one knows what it is an di dont think theycare becos its so bizarre. i did find a site with internal/external trembling. all the girls were saying the same, the endless round of docs/endos/psychiatrists/ chronic fatique etc etc.all wasting nhs money when theyshould be investigating hormones and endocrine organs. there is now a government e-petition site whereby with 100.000 signatures parliament will have to debate the petition so i think we should start this, people are being dumped an d left to struggle- there are a few docs left if you join thyroid uk or- tpathyroid site, they work outside nhs an dprovide natural desicated throid and adrenal support. often low functioning adrenal are connected to low thyroid plus so many other deficiencies.. also go on to healthy pages forum, but something has to be done about this state of affairs , its appaliing in these days, we are not medieval. it is no life to live a suffering one

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shayla77 said on 27 July 2011

It's amazing when you go on any forums about hypothyroidism just how many people are being incorrectly treated! I've been on Levothyroxine for 2 years, get my bloods checked evry two months and the dose changes each time the results come back. Had a lot of problems since April with this between ending up in hospital with a severe panic attack (my first ever horrific experience of these), oedema, weight gain, concentration problems, severe tiredness etc etc and about a month ago i eventually crashed. The GP's response was to lower my thyroxine dose (so am now being undertreated) and prescribe anti-depressants for the panic attacks (as i have regular limited panic attacks as they call them). 3 requests to be referred to an endicronlogist have been refused even though the British Thyroid Foundation suggested i should see one due to a Kidney Disease that i already have though currently in remission. I am now being referred back to my renal consultant even though this disorder has not relapsed!!! Overall i don't think GP's here concern themselves with underactive thyoid patients - as i was told it's the easiest to treat, and further symptoms of this disorder (when being treated) they put down to mental health issues. From my understanding it is common practice to treat both the T3 and T4 in the States in particular...the NHS goes for the cheap option and we suffer the consequences. 1 tip i was given though was to take the levothyroxine on an empty stomach at nightime before bed as it has been proven to be more beneficial. And no this didn't come from my GP or even the pharmacists neither of which ever informed when best to take it. This came from the BTF patient support following one of their meetings with specialists in endocrinology. I've been taking it at night for over a week now and it has helped.

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lizzz said on 05 July 2011

Does anyone know what 37.7 B12 mean. I am being treated for graves disease, but know one seems to know much about it. I was over active now I'm under active. My joints hurt, I have cramps and I'm so tired. I am gaining weight about a stone and a half every 6 weeks, even though i eat less now than before and I suffer horrible sweats. I just want my energy back.

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Klm2010 said on 22 June 2011

My symptoms started 10 years ago. I got fobbed off with the usual " your TSH is in normal range so your fine". Well I wasn't fine I was suffering and gradually daily life was just a chore. I kept persisting and eventually a GP agreed to check more bloods and included my thyroid antibodies which was grossly abnormal. I then got refered and thought great I am getting somewhere. I was wrong. Most endocrinologists go on bloods tests often just TSH and not symptoms. Also most just use thyroxine only as their treatment of choice. I used different doses of thyroxine for a few years and still had symptoms but my specialist was happy with my TSH so didn't want to increase the dose any more. Some symptoms improved but I still wasn't right. You question yourself and do at times think you are going mad. You are not it is the system that is wrong. It is the biggest scandal in modern medicine- hypothyroidism is under diagnosed and under treated- fact! Funny how thyroxine is the cheapest treatment and therefore the treatment of choice! I did my own research and sought a specialist that is willing to think outside the box. I am now on combination treatment t3/t4 and am much better I am still adjusting the dose to find my optimal level but no longer have to lie down after taking a shower!
My best advice to anyone is listen to your body you know best when you are not right, not the dr looking at your blood tests on a piece of paper. Question your treatment if its not right. Do your own research so that you can challenge your management. Studies show that combined treatment can provide better symptomatic relief that thyroxine alone. Look on TPA (thyroid patient advocacy) website which has excellent information that you can give to your GP/Specialist. Finally not one size fits all so you may need to swap and change treatment and dose before you find what's right for you.

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favred said on 08 June 2011

Hi im back.
still not well and not back at work, Finally got my way am on 20 Liothyronine and 50 one day then 25 of Levothyroxine. Still no energy even to shower is such a effort. I think the medication is what causes the problems. Keeps us alive but that's about it. I am going to try and get a drug to give me back my energy . The doctor reckons we are on it but we know that bull. I have tried B12 . I want to try legal amphetamines. Something has to be done about this. They took my thyroid out now I want to have my normal life back. The fatigue specialist waste of time havent got ME but he said very bad fatigue. Well knew that already.

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Chevvy64 said on 25 May 2011

Cont from previous post ...........
Prescribing Levo is not relieving people’s symptoms because it contains only T4, the symptoms will not abate until T3 is added to people's meds. Our doctor's need to be educated on all available treatments, to listen to what their patients are telling them, and not take blood results as the definitive answer to symptoms. Armour thyroid and the other alternatives should again be freely available, and all patients given a choice, and which course of treatment they want to follow, as they have a right to be involved in their own care!

In failing to give choices to patients, and full information to the Doctor's, we are not offering the service the NHS was once famed for and now sadly fails at. Health care is not just the dominion of the medical profession it is for everyone; it involves Doctor’s listening far more than they do to what their patients actually have to say and think; and most important of all how they feel. If full information on choices is not disclosed; or is purposely hidden because the profit margin is not big enough; then this needs to be addressed and dealt with; so the our Health Service regains its reputation, and most of all the public's trust.

I hope that this very, very brief overview is of some help to those struggling with how they feel, and encourages them to read objectively what other help/info is out there. I encourage you to do your own research and arm yourself with information, and then try to discuss it with your doctor so you can work together to find the best treatment for you. I also hope your doctor is a lot more interested in your opinion than mine, and doesn't make you feel like a hypochondriac that needs to be prescribed anti-depressants and removed from their office as quickly as possible.
Best Wishes

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Chevvy64 said on 25 May 2011

Long post so in 2 sections
I apologise in advance as this will not only come across as a bit of a rant, but also as if I am rubbishing our health service, which I assure am not. However, having said that I do think that some sections of the health service are painfully lacking in understanding, care, information ,and also knowledge.
I had a surgical menopause following some minor and then 2 major surgeries; the last one removed my remaining ovary. I have felt unwell for 8 years since then, with all the symptoms of hypothyroid, but the blood tests always come back in the "normal" range. Hypo also runs in my family, but yet I am not treated for this, and I am disregarded due to the test result; and who decided that my normal was within this range? TSH (which is not a thyroid hormone and therefore irrelevant)/T4 levels are being used as the only measure of diagnosing if someone is hypo. It's result is taken as gospel, even though there is a mass of medical evidence and disagreement within the medical community worldwide, as well as the UK; that stipulates these tests are not sufficient. That they don’t take into account other readings that should be done at the same time, to give a fuller and more comprehensive overall view of the situation.
Cont in next post.............

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Chevvy64 said on 25 May 2011

Sorry this is too long for one post so has been split.

I apologise in advance as this will not only come across as a bit of a rant, but also as if I am rubbishing our health service, which I assure am not. However, having said that I do think that some sections of the health service are painfully lacking in understanding, care, information ,and also knowledge.
I had a surgical menopause following some minor and then 2 major surgeries; the last one removed my remaining ovary. I have felt unwell for 8 years since then, with ALL the symptoms of hypothyroid, but the blood tests always come back in the "normal" range. Hypo also runs in my family, but yet I am not treated for this, and I am disregarded due to the test result; and who decided that MY normal was within this range? TSH (which is not a thyroid hormone and therefore irrelevant)/T4 levels are being used as the only measure of diagnosing if someone is hypo. It's result is taken as gospel, even though there is a mass of medical evidence and disagreement within the medical community worldwide, as well as the UK; that stipulates these tests are not sufficient. That they don’t take into account other readings that should be done at the same time, to give a fuller and more comprehensive overall view of the situation.
Cont............

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Chevvy64 said on 25 May 2011

...................Cont from previous post

Prescribing Levo is not relieving people’s symptoms because it contains only T4, the symptoms will not abate until T3 is added to people's meds. Our doctor's need to be educated on all available treatments, to listen to what their patients are telling them, and not take blood results as the definitive answer to symptoms. Armour thyroid and the other alternatives should again be freely available, and all patients given a choice, and which course of treatment they want to follow, as they have a right to be involved in their own care!

In failing to give choices to patients, and full information to the Doctor's, we are not offering the service the NHS was once famed for and now sadly fails at. Health care is not just the dominion of the medical profession it is for everyone; it involves Doctor’s listening far more than they do to what their patients actually have to say and think; and most important of all how they FEEL. If full information on choices is not disclosed; or is purposely hidden because the profit margin is not big enough; then this needs to be addressed and dealt with; so the our Health Service regains its reputation, and most of all the public's trust.

I hope that this very, very brief overview is of some help to those struggling with how they feel, and encourages them to read objectively what other help/info is out there. I encourage you to do your own research and arm yourself with information, and then try to discuss it with your doctor so you can work together to find the best treatment for YOU. I also hope your doctor is a lot more interested in your opinion than mine, and doesn't make you feel like a hypochondriac that needs to be prescribed anti-depressants and removed from their office as quickly as possible.

Best Wishes

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Chevvy64 said on 25 May 2011

Sorry this is too long for one post so has been split.

I apologise in advance as this will not only come across as a bit of a rant, but also as if I am rubbishing our health service, which I assure am not. However, having said that I do think that some sections of the health service are painfully lacking in understanding, care, information ,and also knowledge.
I had a surgical menopause following some minor and then 2 major surgeries; the last one removed my remaining ovary. I have felt unwell for 8 years since then, with ALL the symptoms of hypothyroid, but the blood tests always come back in the "normal" range. Hypo also runs in my family, but yet I am not treated for this, and I am disregarded due to the test result; and who decided that MY normal was within this range? TSH (which is not a thyroid hormone and therefore irrelevant)/T4 levels are being used as the only measure of diagnosing if someone is hypo. It's result is taken as gospel, even though there is a mass of medical evidence and disagreement within the medical community worldwide, as well as the UK; that stipulates these tests are not sufficient. That they don’t take into account other readings that should be done at the same time, to give a fuller and more comprehensive overall view of the situation.
Cont............

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User552720 said on 10 May 2011

I am taking 100 mcg Levothyroxine Sodium, although I would prefer to take Dessicated Natural Thyroxine. Just taking this hormone alone is insufficient because an Endocrinologist needs to investigate if there are other deficiencies. Once this can be ascertained and if additional medication is required your life will improve! Easy for me to say because I just take the one tablet. There needs to be a due process if blood test prove there is a thyroxine deficiency, rather than just prescribing Levothyorixine!

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majbsmcl said on 26 April 2011

I just stopped by to check out thyroid problems and find I am suffering with many of the symptoms described - the worst being overweight, I was always 7.7 and am now 9.6. I suffer with the heat especially of a night and get terrible cramps in my feet. My hair has got very dry and brittle and is falling out, my nails are ridging and then splitting and also all joints hurt occasionally. I am a bit reluctant to go to the doctors after reading the comments above. I think I would prefer to stay as I am rather than become depressed which is what seems to happen when you take the medication. Just wondering if anyone has been happy with their medication.

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willi123 said on 18 April 2011

hi i am on levothyroxine 100mcg per day ihave been taking it at night its suppose to get to the right places without been blocked at first i thought it was working i lost 5llbs now i put it back on? i am very active i go to the gym every day mostly mon to fri and burn 100cals. weekends i go mountain biking. i am now injured hip joint and arm though over doing it trying to lose weight i have asked for break down of my bloods to see what it is thats stopping me from loosing weight i have put on a stone since having an underactive thyroid 2 yr ago. I am now 9stone 10. I have been getting treatment for it since last yr. there are dayts i think and feel like rubish, and think why do i bother and that no one is listening to me at all...I have muscle cramps joint aches, balance rubish, dr says im on to much but how is this if im not losing weight, i was taking 100mcg medication at night but then a bit more at mornings i have now stopped this to see if anytthing changes so far it has, i feel tired achy can not be bothered. is T3 vitamin A !!!!!!!!!!

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User90949 said on 09 April 2011

I've been to docs with weight gain despite cutting down on food, tired all time, no energy, palpitations resulting in time off work my tsh levels are 1.9 (were 1.7) still on the lower end of the normal scale and no this is fine depsite feeling crap and having no energy, getting itching burning pain in thigh muscle. but no i dont have any thyroid probs docs say..... going to try kelp and if i see an improvement i'm going back to docs to see what can be done , also they only did a TSH not a T4 check when they took bloods (even my local chemist was surprised at that)!!!!

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chelli said on 19 March 2011

Hi, Ive been diagnosed with underactive a few month and i have regular blood tests to adjust my Lev medication. Im now on 100microgrms and to be honest I feel worse than what I did in the begining. Im aching allover, can barly get out of bed, depressed and headachy. Is this normal or do these tablets not suit me. Ive got an important job role so need to be on top form, any advise is apreciated

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hibii said on 16 March 2011

@ user User527616

All we do is talk and nobody listens. The Samaritans can't give us increased or decreased or different medicines.They can listen but that doesn't make our medical issues go away. They certianly can't bring back your job as you've been sacked for being so ill and out of it.

Talking can help but what we want is our collective voices heard and to stop the medical fraternity telling us the blood results are normal, when we all are very clearly telling you we are suffering.

Why won't the NHS accept when a patyent says, I feel like I should be 1000 years old as I ache I'm exhausted etc, despite being only 30, 40, 50yrs etc, and treat us with increased dosages, decreased dosages or another version of thyroxine etc, even if the bloods say its normal.

I'd like to meet the person who says what range is normal and who it actually applies to. Most on here would agree it doesn't apply to them.

Do you and the NHS etc realise how ill we actually are, do you even care?

I think we all know the answer to the last retorical question, we're suffering the proof of that.





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Trixc said on 08 March 2011

I have never been diagnosed with underactive thyroid, but my symptoms are similar. My doctor checked by blood levels and said they were okay, slightly anaemic, but okay. I feel tired all the time, no energy, gained weight (I'm about 9 stone, but always weighed about 7st 10lb. I'm 55 and going through the menopause, so my symptoms were put down to that. I get cramp everyday in my legs, no concentration or interest in anything for that matter, my eyes are dreadful, with severe bags which are not hereditary. I feel cold most of the time. To make matters wose I have now developed a "tic" in my right eyebag! A bit comical, but very distressing. I hate looking at people as I'm sure they are staring. I'm taking Menopace, which seems to help with nightsweats (menopause). I feel that I am wasting my doctors time and that he will think I want to be diagnosed with an under active thyroid, which I don't, I jut want an answer. Am I imagining this?

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maz123 said on 25 February 2011

Does anyone know anything about the importance or otherwise of vitamin D3 in combating hypothyroidism

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favred said on 15 February 2011

All my comments have been deleted . Why bother to comment. Has made me very suspicious.

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favred said on 15 February 2011

Hello User527616.
I dont feel like its much of a life . But reading your comments you shouldnt be waiting to die. What can we all do about this. There are so many of us. Has made me realise we are not being given the right treatment or the right care.

Everyone of us have got to think of a way to make a difference.. A problem shared.

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favred said on 15 February 2011

Levothyroxine isn't working . Have tried different amounts. I have been told Liothyronine is good. Many comments on patients on these or even both have more positive feed back. Asked my doctor for these but he wont give them to me. I cant get to see specialist because blood test reckons level is ok. I feel so ill have even played with the amount of levothyroxine just the same result. Ill no energy the same as everyone on here. I feel sick first thing in the morning. Have been off work for over three months. How are we going to be heard life is passing by and I just stay indoors . Just wish some one would read these comments and do something.

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RosieTalk said on 10 February 2011

User527616,

If you are feeling in despair try and find someone you trust to talk to. It could be a relative, a friend or someone else that you feel comfortable with.

There are people who understand, and who can help you deal with the problems you are experiencing.

You can visit www.samaritans.org.uk/, email jo@samaritans.co.uk or call 08457 90 90 90.

Rosie, UGC Manager, NHS Choices

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User527616 said on 10 February 2011

@so thats it, yes, me!
I'm hyperthyroid and was put on levothyroxine, I started feeling better after about 10 days which lasted another 10 days, then I went down hill until I was no longer able to eat or walk because of muscle weakness. I stopped taking the thyroxine and within a week was back to the state I was in before starting. The doctors don't care and insist I should start taking it aagin, but whats the point.
I'm just waiting to die now cos nobody is doing anything to help :(

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Daniel Holmes said on 02 February 2011

IT CAN BE verry hard ihad it from birth if you laps you will see all the simtoms you dont want that im training to fight in muaythai but struggle with wait conversion im 6ft and weigh 12stone iam gaining muscle at aslow pace what ever eforts you try to keep fit and well add percent more cause your body wont do what you need to afishant ly anoth ipush my self as much as posable but it not anoth ineedv to speed up my matablasim is there any thing other than steroids that could help

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CBM40 said on 13 January 2011

Hi Carol
I've just been diagnosed with an underactive thyroid & was very interested to see your comments about being hot - I'm exactly the same! In fact it was being tested for an early menopause that revealed the thyroid problem. My GP says she does not believe the "night sweats" are thyroid related but we are going to see if there is an improvement once my medication kicks in.
Perhaps it's worth having the menopause blood test just in case but if it helps you are not alone in feeling excessively hot.
C

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CBM40 said on 13 January 2011

Hi Carol
I've just been diagnosed with an underactive thyroid & was very interested to see your comments about being hot - I'm exactly the same! In fact it was being tested for an early menopause that revealed the thyroid problem. My GP says she does not believe the "night sweats" are thyroid related but we are going to see if there is an improvement once my medication kicks in.
Perhaps it's worth having the menopause blood test just in case but if it helps you are not alone in feeling excessively hot.
C

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User513773 said on 02 January 2011

My partner has for years suffered with an underactive thyroid and has been prescribed thyroxine. However, she frequently forgets to take her medication, sometimes for days. All the classic behavioural symptoms are then eventually expressed and she seems to lapse into a trance-like state. When she is like this she will not accept that regular medication is essential for the effective control of the condition, and she steadily gets more and more out of sorts. This is quite difficult to deal with and I wonder what I can do to help. Eventually she starts the medication again, but I am concerned about long term side effects of insufficient medication. Any ideas?

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carol 1 said on 23 September 2010

How good is it to find out I am not alone!!!! Why won't GP's listen when you tell them how you are feeling, but just because your blood test comes back Ok and you are a 'run of the mill' patient, you can't be sent to a specialist!!! I was diagnosed 6 years ago after having symptoms for approx 3 years before. ie weight gain, exhaustion, hair loss, constipation etc and when it was finally diagnosed I was taking 150mcg of levothyroxine, which has now been reduced to 125mcg. I still can't lose the weight, feel exhausted all the time, joint and muscle pain and the only symptom I don't seem to have in common with the other people is feeling the cold. In fact I have the opposite problem, I'm so hot all the time and the perspiration running down my back and face gets very uncomfortable!!! My feet feel like they are on fire most of the time, especially at night. Maybe the menopause to blame here but I'm taking HRT so who knows?? Does anyone else have this problem? I'm just so fed up with feeling 'unwell', have just retired and want to be able to enjoy it without feeling exhausted all the time and I'm sure my husband would love an answer to the mood swings and depression!!! If only GP's would realise it might be quite a common and easily fixed problem but for those who have it, it isn't that simple. Please listen to us!!!!

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sothatsit said on 04 July 2010

Has anyone out there had adverse reactions to levoythyroxine?
I was started on a low dose and within 4 weeks was virtually crippled with worse muscle cramping than I ever suffered as one of the original symptoms.
After another blood test I've been temporarily taken off the drug (3 weeks now) and am due to go back to the docs in a few days.
Meanwhile the original symptoms ie tiredness, lack of concentration etc which I felt had begun to improve, have returned while the severe cramping has subsided.

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