Treating gallstones 

Your treatment plan will depend on how the symptoms are affecting your daily life.

If you don't have any symptoms, a policy of ‘active monitoring’ is often recommended. This means you will receive no immediate treatment, but you should let your GP know if you notice any symptoms.

As a general rule, the longer you go without symptoms, the less likely it is that your condition will get worse.

You may need treatment if you have a condition that increases your risk of developing complications, such as:

Treatment may also be recommended if a scan shows high levels of calcium inside your gallbladder, as this can lead to gallbladder cancer in later life.

If you have episodes of abdominal pain (biliary colic), treatment will depend on how the pain affects your daily activities. If the episodes are mild and infrequent, you may be prescribed painkillers to control further episodes and given advice about eating a healthy diet to help control the pain.

If your symptoms are more severe and occur frequently, gallbladder removal surgery will usually be recommended. The gallbladder is not an essential organ and most people notice little difference without it.

Keyhole surgery

In most cases, keyhole surgery will be used to remove your gallbladder if surgery is recommended. This is known as a laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

During a laparoscopic cholecystectomy, three or four small cuts (each about 1cm or less) are made in your abdomen. One cut will be by the belly button and the others will be on the right side of your abdomen.

Your abdomen is temporarily inflated using carbon dioxide gas. This is harmless and makes it easier for the surgeon to see your organs.

laparoscope (a long thin telescope with a tiny light and video camera at the end) is inserted through one of the cuts in your abdomen. This allows your surgeon to view the operation on a video monitor. Your surgeon will then remove your gallbladder using special surgical instruments.

Sometimes, if it's thought there may be gallstones in the bile duct, an X-ray of the bile duct is also taken during the operation. If gallstones are found, they can sometimes be removed during keyhole surgery. If the operation cannot be done this way or an unexpected complication occurs, it may have to be converted to open surgery (see below).

After the gallbladder has been removed, the gas in your abdomen escapes through the laparoscope and the cuts are closed with dissolvable stitches and covered with dressings.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomies are usually performed under a general anaesthetic, which means you will asleep during the procedure and won't feel any pain while it's carried out. The operation takes 60-90 minutes and you can usually go home the same day. Full recovery typically takes around 10 days.

Single-incision keyhole surgery

Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a newer type of keyhole surgery used to remove the gallbladder. During this type of surgery, only one small cut is made, which means you will only have one barely visible scar.

However, single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomies haven’t been carried out as often as conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomies, so there are still some uncertainties about it. Access to this type of surgery is also limited because it needs an experienced surgeon with specialist training.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has more information on single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Open surgery

In some circumstances, a laparoscopic cholecystectomy may not be recommended. This may be due to technical reasons, safety concerns or if there is a stone in the bile duct that cannot be removed another way.

A laparoscopic cholecystectomy may not be recommended if you:

  • are in the third trimester (the last three months) of pregnancy
  • are obese – extremely overweight with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above
  • you have an unusual gallbladder or bile duct structure that makes a keyhole procedure difficult and potentially dangerous

In these circumstances, an open cholecystectomy may be recommended. During this procedure, a 10-15cm (4-6in) incision is made in your abdomen underneath the ribs so the gallbladder can be removed. This is done under general anaesthetic, so you will be asleep while it is carried out and won't feel any pain.

Open surgery is just as effective as laparoscopic surgery, but it does have a longer recovery time and causes more visible scarring. Most people have to stay in hospital for up to five days and it typically takes six weeks to fully recover.

Read more about recovering from gallbladder surgery.

Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP)

An endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) is a procedure that can be used to remove gallstones from the bile duct. However, the gallbladder is not removed during this procedure so any stones in the gallbladder will remain unless removed using the surgical techniques mentioned above.

ERCP is similar to a diagnostic cholangiography (see diagnosing gallstones for more information), where an endoscope (a long, thin flexible tube with a camera at the end) is passed through your mouth down to where the bile duct opens into the small intestine.

However, during ERCP the opening of the bile duct is widened with a small incision or an electrically heated wire. The bile duct stones are then removed or left to pass into your intestine and out of your body.

Sometimes a small tube called a stent is permanently placed in the bile duct to help the bile and stones pass.

An ERCP is usually carried out under sedation, which means you will be awake throughout the procedure but will not experience any pain.

The ERCP procedure lasts about 30 minutes on average, but it can take anywhere from 15 minutes to over an hour. You may need to stay overnight in hospital after the procedure so you can be monitored.

Medication to dissolve gallstones

If your gallstones are small and don't contain calcium, it may be possible to take ursodeoxycholic acid tablets to dissolve them.

However, these are not prescribed very often because they are rarely very effective, they need to be taken for a long time (up to two years) and gallstones can recur once treatment is stopped.

Side effects of ursodeoxycholic acid are uncommon and are usually mild. The most commonly reported side effects are feeling sick, being sick and itchy skin.

The use of ursodeoxycholic acid is not usually recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Sexually active women should use either a barrier method of contraception, such as a condom, or a low-dose oestrogen contraceptive pill while taking ursodeoxycholic acid, as it may affect other types of oral contraceptive pills.

Ursodeoxycholic acid tablets are occasionally also prescribed as a precaution against gallstones if it is thought that you are at risk of developing them. For example, you may be prescribed ursodeoxycholic acid if you have recently had weight loss surgery, as rapid weight loss can cause gallstones to grow.

 



Gallstones

Gallstones are the most common cause of emergency hospital admission for people with abdominal pain. About 8% of the adult population has gallstones and 50,000 people a year have an operation to remove their gallbladder.

Media last reviewed: 14/11/2013

Next review due: 14/11/2015

Diet and gallstones

In the past, people with gallstones who were not suitable for surgery were sometimes advised to adopt a very low fat diet to stop the gallstones growing.

However, recent evidence suggests this is not helpful because rapid weight loss resulting from a very low fat diet can actually cause gallstones to grow.

Therefore, if surgery is not recommended or you want to avoid having an operation, it is advisable to adopt a healthy and balanced diet based on the 'eatwell plate'. This involves eating a variety of foods – including moderate amounts of fat – and having regular meals.

A healthy diet will not cure gallstones or completely eliminate your symptoms, but it can improve your general health and help control pain caused by gallstones.

Read more about healthy eating.

Page last reviewed: 18/11/2013

Next review due: 18/11/2015